Ramona Curry

November 4th, 2015 No comments

china

Friday, November 6, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM in Cobb 311
Ramona Curry, “Pioneering Figures in Chinese Film in Los Angeles, 1918-1934”

Please join us for a joint session with the Mass Culture Workshop on Friday, November 6 at 10:30 AM in Cobb 311. We will be welcoming Ramona Curry, Associate Professor of English, Media and Cinema Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She will discuss a section of “Pioneering Figures in Chinese Film in Los Angeles, 1918-1934,” a chapter from her book in progress, Trading in Cultural Spaces: How Chinese Film Came to America.

This workshop is being held in conjunction with a Film Studies Center event. A Trip Through China will be screened in Logan 201 on Thursday, Nov. 5 at 7:00 PM. This screening has been curated by Pao-Chen Tang, Ph.D. student in Cinema and Media Studies; Yuqian Yan, Ph.D. candidate in Cinema and Media Studies; and Zhang Ling, Ph.D. candidate in Cinema and Media Studies as part of the Film Studies Center’s Graduate Student Curatorial Program. This event is co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies. This screening will include live piano accompaniment by Anthony Cheung and Lu Wang, and will conclude with a round table discussion featuring Prof. Curry. Please find full details for this event on the Film Studies Center’s website.

Refreshments will be provided at the workshop.

Prof. Curry’s paper is available for download at this link, along with supplementary readings from her book in progress. If you have not received the password for the post, or if you have concerns about accessibility, please feel free to contact David Krolikoski at davidkroli at uchicago.edu or Brian White at bmwhite at uchicago.edu.

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Carly Buxton

October 23rd, 2015 No comments

buxton

Friday, October 30, 3:00-5:00PM in CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St)
Carly Buxton, “Performing Japaneseness: American Nisei Moving and Thinking as Imperial Subjects in Wartime Japan

On Friday, October 30, please join us in welcoming Carly Buxton, who will present a work-in-progress version of her dissertation chapter. As Carly explains, “In this chapter, I examine the ways in which the physical environment and social discourse surrounding American Nisei (second generation Japanese) in wartime Japan stimulated Nisei to stifle their American traits and perform the roles expected of Japanese citizens.  Nisei were fused into the imperial populace via the same channels of the physical body through which they were severed from the American populace; their speech, thought, physical appearance, and bodily movement were not only directed away from the concept of America, but were redirected toward the Japanese imperial cause.  To demonstrate this process in the lives of Nisei in wartime Japan, I begin with a broad historical sketch of assimilation policies adopted by the imperialist Japanese administration, and I consider the place of Nisei as subjects of Japan’s imperial dominion. I then examine elements of the physical environment in wartime Japan designed to unite the populace through public mediation of individual emotions such as anxiety, fear, and grief.  I conclude by considering the body in motion—Nisei performing work for the imperial cause as soldiers, students, volunteers, and government employees.”

A draft of Carly’s paper is available at this link. If you have not received the password for the post, or if you have concerns about accessibility, please feel free to contact David Krolikoski at davidkroli at uchicago.edu or Brian White at bmwhite at uchicago.edu.

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October 23rd, 2015 Enter your password to view comments.

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Joshua Solomon

October 12th, 2015 No comments

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Friday, October 16, 3:00-5:00PM in CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St)
Joshua Solomon, “Mass Twang/Folk Twang: A New Historiography of the Aesthetics of Tsugaru-jamisen

On Friday, October 16, please join us in welcoming Joshua Solomon, who will present a work-in-progress version of a dissertation chapter. As Joshua explains, “This chapter offers a new historiography of Tsugaru folk music, with an emphasis on technological appropriations and the critical role of production.  Through a detailed close up of the musician Takahashi Chikuzan’s musical and cultural discourse, I argue that the historical trends of capitalization and massification of Tsugaru folk music, and Tsugaru-jamisen in particular, reflect a fundamental shift in away from a “folk epistemology.”  I do not suggest a narrative of irretrievable loss; on the contrary, I suggest that the sujimichi [principle] of a non-modern Tsugaru aesthetic economy is inherited in much contemporary shamisen performance, although in sometimes significantly muted forms.  Based on these observations, I suggest a wider critique of the ways in which we modernized and massified scholars might prepare ourselves to approach non-modern/ folk musics in the future.”

A draft of Joshua’s paper is available at this link. If you have not received the password for the post, or if you have concerns about accessibility, please feel free to contact David Krolikoski at davidkroli at uchicago.edu or Brian White at bmwhite at uchicago.edu.

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October 12th, 2015 Enter your password to view comments.

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Japan Studies Workshop

September 29th, 2015 No comments

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Fall 2015 Schedule

September 15th, 2015 No comments
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Harris School/Center for East Asian Studies, 1155 E 60th St

 

Unless otherwise noted our workshop meets from 3:00-5:00 p.m. at 1155 E 60th St (60th and Woodlawn) in Room 319.

Fall 2015 Schedule

October 16 (F), 3:00-5:00, Joshua Solomon (East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago)

October 30 (F), 3:00-5:00, Carly Buxton (East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago)

November 6 (F), 10:30-12:30 in Cobb 311, Ramona Curry (Associate Professor of English, Media and Cinema Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign) (co-sponsored by Mass Culture) * Please note the time and location of this workshop.

November 20 (F), 12:00-2:00 in JRL 122, Paul Vierthaler (Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellow, Boston College) (co-sponsored by the Digital Humanities Forum) * Please note the time and location of this workshop. 

December 4 (F), 3:00-5:00, William Carroll (Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago)

If you are interested in presenting at the workshop, please contact David Krolikoski (davidkroli at uchicago.edu) or Brian White (bmwhite at uchicago.edu).

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May 16th, 2015 No comments

episode 56 (2)Friday, May 22, 3:00-5:00PM in CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St)
Daniel Johnson, “Re-collecting Old Media: The Intimate Transmissions of Amachan

On Friday, May 22, please join us in welcoming Daniel Johnson, who will present a paper that is part of a larger project on what Daniel calls “convergence anxiety.” As Daniel explains, “This refers to the tensions between different types of users, producers, and audiences in contemporary media culture within discourses (and processes) of media convergence. The plan is to draw on a range of case studies from a variety of fields (television, internet, film, gaming, etc.) to consider some of the affective attachments and social organizations that appear around different media cultures and how those attachments animate particular media forms in anxious ways. Key to this sense of anxiety will be the question of gender and how different types of performers and consumers have their identities intensified, threatened, and turned into spectacle by shifting patterns of reception and exposure in contemporary media landscapes. This paper, ‘Re-collecting Media: The Intimate Transmissions of Amachan,‘ discusses some of these ideas in relation to a 2013 TV serialized drama from Japan. My interest in this show stems from the way it represents ‘old’ media forms like VHS and television in relation to ‘new’ media forms like broadband and online media. It is particularly through how some sense of a value system of intimacy in media culture seems to emerge from Amachan‘s investment in tangible media forms, inelastic broadcast time, and personal curation that these topics will be discussed.”

A draft of Daniel’s paper is available at this link. If you have not received the password for the post, or if you have concerns about accessibility, please feel free to contact Nicholas Lambrecht at lambrecht at uchicago.edu. Light refreshments will be served at the workshop. We look forward to seeing you on Friday!

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May 13th, 2015 Enter your password to view comments.

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April 28th, 2015 No comments

Legacies and Developments

Categories: China, General Interest, Korea Tags: