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Thursday, April 17th, from 4-5:20, Dr. Jessica Bishop-Royce, Methodologist at DePaul University, and Serpent Libertine Present: “Preliminary Results from the Erotic Labor Market Survey”

By , April 17, 2014 2:58 pm

Hello all,

Please join us today, Thursday April 17th (4:00-5:20pm, SS 302) to hear Jessica Bishop-Royse, Senior Research Methodologist at DePaul University, and Serpent Libertine, sex worker activist, present their paper “Preliminary Results from the Erotic Market Labor Study”.  A description of the project and a bio for our speaker is below.
Food will be provided. We hope to see you there!

Abstract:

 

Little is known about the extent of trafficking among persons involved in the exchange of sex for material gain.  Media representations of erotic labor are inaccurate and sensationalistic, offering biased depictions of sex workers and their working conditions.  While representations have been based on findings from methodologically weak research, they have been used to propagate narrow conceptualizations of sex work, sex workers, and their working conditions.   Moreover, this attention has produced prohibitionist policies that increase the risk of negative outcomes for sex workers.  We present findings from a pilot study that employs underutilized methodology to assess sex workers’ experiences with trafficking within the erotic labor market in the United States.

 

 

Jessica Bishop-Royse is the SSRC’s Senior Research Methodologist. She joined DePaul after completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the Florida State University College of Medicine. Her graduate work includes fieldwork in Malawi and internships/work experience with federal and state health agencies. She has also conducted program evaluations of county and state health programs. She earned her PhD in Sociology in 2010. Her dissertation examined the individual and community level characteristics associated with racial differences in cause-specific infant mortality. She has academic interest in: demography, health disparities, infant and maternal health, public health, methods, and statistics.

Serpent Libertine is a sex worker, activist, filmmaker, board member with Sex Workers Outreach Project-Chicago, former media team coordinator for the national sex worker organization Desiree Alliance,  and created the sex worker-made media site Red Light District Chicago.  She is part of the team behind the creation of the Adult Industry Truth and the Erotic Labor Market Survey.

Thursday, February 27th, from 3-4:20, Jeffrey Parker, PhD Student in Sociology, Presents: “Negotiating the space between avant-garde and ‘hip enough’: businesses and commercial gentrification in Wicker Park”

By , February 23, 2014 2:28 pm
Please join us this upcoming Thursday, February 27th from 3:00-4:20pm in SS 401 to hear Jeffrey Parker, PhD Student in the Sociology Department at Chicago, present his paper Negotiating the space between avant-garde and “hip enough”: businesses and commercial gentrification in Wicker Park”. Forest Gregg, PhD Student in the Sociology Department at Chicago, will be serving as the discussant.
 
Please note the time change for this week. We will be starting at 3:00pm.

Also, food (Pizza Capri!) will be provided. 
We hope to see you there!

Abstract: Gentrification literature has focused mostly on either growth machines pursuing profits or individual residents pursuing taste preferences, to the exclusion of the cultural intermediaries that connect these processes, particularly businesses. More recent research has begun to address this gap in the literature, but even those who focus on commercial gentrification tell only part of the story, neglecting the attitudes and decision-making of business-owners themselves and ignoring the diversity of businesses in gentrifying neighborhoods, instead focusing on a particular type—the independent store or boutique—identified with neighborhood change. This article attempts to contribute to this growing literature by exploring attitudes of business-owners themselves, and expanding the focus beyond just boutiques and independent businesses. Specifically, it uses the West Chicago neighborhood of Wicker Park to ask the question “Under what circumstances do business-owners and –managers come to embrace or repudiate gentrification in their neighborhood?” Business-owners and –managers support gentrification when they understand it primarily as an alternative to financial instability and repudiate gentrification when they understand it primarily as a disruptor of aesthetic stability. There is a common understanding of the neighborhood’s reputational hipness across respondents, but those who support gentrification tend to value this reputational hipness instrumentally (as something that could conceivably attract people to the neighborhood to shop), while those opposed to it tend to value it intrinsically (as something that makes the neighborhood worth being in).

Please contact Theresa Anasti at tanasti@uchicago.edu for an advance copy of the paper.

CSS Workshop CANCELLED Thursday, February 6th

By , February 6, 2014 3:48 pm

Professor Greg Scott’s workshop for February 6th has been rescheduled for April 17th.  Today’s workshop has been cancelled.

Burt Dit, Graduate Student in Sociology, presents “The Four Domains of Aggression and Violence” at City, Space and Society Workshop January 30th

By , January 27, 2014 1:30 pm

Please join us on Thursday January 29th, in SS 401 from 4:00-5:20, to hear Burt Dit, advanced graduate student in sociology at the University of Chicago, present his paper: “The Four Domains of Aggression and Violence”.

Food and drink will be served.

Bethany Everett, Assistant Professor of Sociology at UIC to present at CSS workshop January 23rd

By , January 20, 2014 12:32 pm

Please join us this Thursday, January 23rd (4:00-5:20pm, SS 401) to hear Bethany Everett, Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of Illinois at Chicago, present her paper ‘Investigating Pathways to Teenage Pregnancy Among Sexual Minority Adolescents: Stigma Management and the Role of Place‘.  Alida Bouris, assistant professor at the School of Social Service Administration, will serve as the discussant.

The abstract is below and her paper is attached. We hope to see you there!

Abstract:Previous research has found that sexual minority youth are more likely to report pregnancies during adolescence compared to their heterosexual counterparts. This paper investigates one mechanism linking sexual minority youth to increased teen pregnancy: attitudes about sex and pregnancy. Using Goffman’s Stigma Management Theory and Wave I of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N=12,983) I employ latent class analysis and OLS regression to investigate both the role of the social environment (e.g. urban, percent college graduates in neighborhood, percent Republican voters) on sexual minority adolescents’ attitudes about sex and pregnancy. Sexual minority girls are more likely to report positive attitudes and diminished negative attitudes about teen pregnancy compared to heterosexual girls. Sexual minority boys report less positive attitudes about sex and pregnancy than heterosexual boys. The results also show that the social environment exerts a strong influence on attitudes about sex and pregnancy and moderates the relationship between sexual minority status and attitudes about sex and pregnancy.

Please contact Theresa Anasti at tanasti@uchicago.edu for an advance copy of the paper.

Jolyon Ticer-Wurr Presents “Linking Routines Beyond Dover: Overcrowding and the Consolidation of a White-Ethnic and Hispanic Mayoral Coalition”

By , January 8, 2014 3:34 pm

Please join us on January 16th from 4:00-5:20 for the first CSS meeting of the quarter!  PhD Candidate Jolyon Ticer-Wurr will present a dissertation chapter entitled: “Linking Routines Beyond Dover: Overcrowding and the Consolidation of a White-Ethnic and Hispanic Mayoral Coalition”.

The meeting will take place in SS 401.  Food will be served.

Schedule for Winter Quarter 2014

By , January 8, 2014 3:19 pm

City, Society and Space Workshop: Winter Quarter 2014

Thursday, January 16th, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

Linking Routines Beyond Dover: Overcrowding and the Consolidation of a White-Ethnic and Hispanic Mayoral Coalition

Jolyon Ticer-Wurr, Doctoral Student, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

 

Thursday, January 23rd, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

Pathways to Teenage Pregnancy among Sexual Minority Adolescents: Stigma Management and the Role of Place

Bethany Everett, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Thursday, January 30th, 4:00-5:20 Social Science Research Building, Room 401

The Four Domains of Aggression and Violence

Burt Ditkowsky, Graduate Student, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

 

Thursday, February 6th, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

TBA

Greg Scott, Professor, Department of Sociology, DePaul University

 

Thursday, February 13th, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

 Repasts: A Life Course Approach to ‘Hunger’ in Later Life

Lauren Pilgrim, Doctoral Student, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

 

Thursday, February 20th, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

‘Stars’ and the Connectivity of Cultural Industry Worldcities: An Empirical Social Network Analysis of Human Capital Mobility and its Implications for Economic Development

Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, Associate Professor, Price School of Public Policy, University of Southern California

 

Thursday, February 27th, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

Negotiating the Space Between Avant-garde and “Hip enough”: Businesses and Commercial Gentrification in Wicker Park

Jeffrey Nathaniel Parker, Doctoral Student, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

 

Thursday, March 6th, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

Bridging at the Boundary: The Cultural Work of Cricket among Jamaican Immigrants in the US

Marcelle Medford-Lee, Doctoral Student, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

 

Thursday, March 13th, 4:00-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room 401

TBA

David Schalliol, Doctoral Student, Department of Sociology, Loyola University Chicago

Please contact Theresa Anasti at tanasti@uchicago.edu if you desire an advanced copy of the paper.  Papers should be received one week prior to the workshop.

Chris Graziul, Doctoral Student in Sociology presents “Social Venues: A New Approach to Social Constraint” (Time change to 3 pm)

By , November 20, 2013 1:28 pm

Please join us at 3 pm (please note time change!) in SS 401 to hear Sociology PhD Candidate Chris Graziul present his work, entitled “Social Venues: A New Approach to Social Constraint.”

Abstract:

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, social network analysis and ecological approaches to
social phenomena experienced a kind of renaissance, with new paradigms solidifying their place in each
area of research. Studies of the formal properties of social networks led to the development of a
sophisticated set of theoretical approaches and empiric tools for exploring network structure (Burt 1980).
A population ecology approach to the study of organizations emerged, revitalizing the study of
organizational ecology (Hannan and Freeman 1977; Carroll 1984). I contend that while these
developments were related, issues concerning the scope of research agendas led to little serious work that
joined these approaches in a coherent way.
Their relationship, and the source of these scope issues, arises from the boundary specification
problem in network analysis (Laumann, Marsden, and Prensky 1983). Combined with an open systems
interpretation of organizations, it suggests that the scope of a unified ecologic and network approach to
social structure is effectively boundless. Through the introduction of geographic location and spaces for
social interaction, an ecology of association proposes a way to limit the scope of such a project, and
therefore allows researchers to study the unique implications of such an analytic synthesis.
This chapter includes four sections. The first outlines the demand for such an expansive
paradigm in both organizational analysis and the study of social networks. Next, an ecology of
association is constructed. In the process I demonstrate that both research paradigms indicate the
importance of spaces for social interaction. Third, I consider several theoretical implications of an
ecology of association. I conclude by considering a few of the limitations of this paradigm.

Please contact Theresa Anasti at tanasti@uchicago.edu for an advance copy of the paper.

Food will be served.

Ron Weitzer, Professor of Sociology to Present “Europe’s Legal Red-Light Districts: Comparing Different Models and Distilling Best Practices” at City, Society and Space Workshop

By , October 16, 2013 10:46 pm

Please join us to hear Ron Weitzer, Professor of Sociology at George Washington University, present his paper “Europe’s  at the Workshop on City, Society and Space, Thursday October 24, 4-5:20, Social Science Research Building, Room SS 401.  Lara Jansen, Department of Sociology, will serve as the discussant after the talk.  Then, we will open for questions and discussion.  Pizza will be served.

Co-Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

Please email Theresa Anasti at tanasti@uchicago.edu for an advance copy of the paper.

ABSTRACT:

Research on modern red-light districts is deficient. Centered largely on street prostitution zones and nations where prostitution is illegal, this literature gives insufficient attention to settings where red-light districts consist of indoor venues that are legal and regulated by the authorities. Using classic Chicago School writings on vice districts as a point of departure, the paper examines the physical structure and social organization of three red-light zones. The comparative analysis identifies major differences in the social ecology of the settings, which are explained by (1) the distinctive ways in which each municipal government manages its respective red-light district and (2) the contrasting social backgrounds and political capital of the population residing in the vicinity of each district. Policy implications are briefly discussed.

 

Welcome to Autumn Quarter 2013!

By , October 1, 2013 9:01 am

The first event of the Autumn Quarter will be a welcome event on Thursday October 10th, in the Social Sciences Research Building, Room 401 from 4-5:20.  We hope this meeting will allow students and faculty to discuss the direction in which they want to see the workshop go.  All students and faculty are welcome to the meeting, and we also welcome those coming from other academic institutions.  Pizza will be served!  If you have any questions feel free to contact one of the co-coordinators:

Theresa Anasti, SSA PhD Student, tanasti@uchicago.edu

Brian Tuohy, Sociology PhD Student, btuohy@uchicago.edu

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