Feb 25 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Cramming a Way Out: The Organizational Transformation of Shadow Schools in China

Le Lin

Ph.D Student Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

February 25, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Coming out of the working draft of my dissertation proposal, this presentation aims at clarifying the research questions and generating hypotheses that can guide my fieldwork. My dissertation project investigates the organizational transformation of Chinese shadow schools from 1980 to 2010. A chronology of the changes at the institutional and organizational field level is delineated in the first place. Based on this chronology and other organizational level data, I show that this field which used to abound exclusively with small ‘fruit flies’ schools has transitioned into one in which a few leading brands play influential and even dominant roles. Several leading schools have evolved into new organizational forms of large bureaucratic for-profit and even publicly-traded corporate groups. My research question, therefore, is why, given the unfavorable institutional environments, formerly charismatic and patriarchic leader and teachers and especially star teachers’ resistance to bureaucratization and threat to the survival of schools, the new organizational form emerged. A short literature review is provided and relevant alternative explanations are discussed. I propose my hypotheses and research design at the end.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Feb 11 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

The Lasting Impact of Parental Early Life Malnutrition on Their Offspring: Evidence from the China Great Leap Forward Famine

Belton Fleisher

Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics

Ohio State University

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

February 11, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
We explore whether the second generation’s level of schooling is negatively impacted by their parents’ malnutrition in utero, using the China Famine as a natural experiment. We find that famine-induced  mother’s malnutrition reduced second generation male and female entrance into junior secondary school by about 5-7 percentage points. We measure famine severity with provincial excess death rates instrumented by measures of adverse climate conditions. Our findings indicate the existence of an important second-generation multiplier of policies that support the nutrition of pregnant women and infants in any country where nutritional deficiencies remain today.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Jan 28 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

How the Internet Affects Overseas Chinese Political Activism in China

David Benson

PhD candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

January 28, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Political activism in China is an important and well-studied phenomenon. One less well understood aspect of Chinese political activism, however, are overseas activists within the Overseas expatriate community. Innovations in communication technology, such as the internet, have recently made communication over great distances comparatively cheap. The decrease in cost of long distance communication has led some observers to conclude that the overseas community might be able to capitalize on their locations, utilizing cheap long-distance communication to affect political change in China. This article, which forms a summary of several sections of my dissertation which are still in development, examines the role of the internet in mobilizing overseas Chinese for activism within China. I argue that because transnational activism is inherently high-risk, with low probability of reward, most transnational activists are parts of robust social groups which provide social and emotional motives and support for the high risk activism. Since robust social networks are a function of strong ties, which are usually built in person, the increase in weak ties, over the internet, will have little effect on the generation of real world political activity. However, pre-existing groups will be able to utilize new media communications to their own advantage, just not to increase real-world political activism.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Jan 14 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Migration, Child Development and Government Policy in China

Rebecca Myerson

PhD candidate, Harris School of Public Policy

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

January 14, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
According to recent estimates, there are over 260 million people migrating for work within China, and about 70% of their children live apart from one or both parents. Due to the unique hukou (residential permit) system in China, access to government social services for children varies widely by location and migration status. In order to capture how parents make migration decisions and the implications for child development and policy, I developed a simple structural model based on the Solon (2004) extension of Becker and Tomes (1979). In the model, parents care about their own current consumption and their child’s future earnings; they can choose between three migration scenarios (migrating and bringing their child, migrating and leaving their child behind, or staying in the rural area), and they can choose their levels of time and monetary investments in their child. I analyzed possible changes in government policy and corresponding parental reactions including changes in migration, time and monetary investment. More detailed predictions can be developed in future drafts. I find that possible changes in government policy vary in their effects on rural hukou children. Increasing government monetary investment in children in rural areas does not necessarily yield a positive influence on them. In contrast, raising governmental support for migrant children in urban areas increases parental time investment without decreasing total monetary investment in children, and is the best policy considered in this paper.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Dec 3 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Endogenous Altruism: Theory and Evidence from Chinese Twins

 

Junjian Yi

Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Economics

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

December 3, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
In this paper, I investigate the endogenous formation of inter-sibling altruism and its implications for intra-household investment in children’s human capital. The theoretical analysis shows that parental fostering of inter-sibling altruism during childhood serves as a device to ameliorate commitment constraints within families. The increase in inter-sibling altruism enhances total returns from intra-household investment in children’s human capital by allocating more resources to better-endowed children, and decreases inequality in the distribution of consumption among children via inter-sibling transfers. Theoretical predictions are supported by the empirical results that are based on the Chinese longitudinal child twin survey. I find that parents are more likely to educate their children to be altruistic toward one another when gaps in children’s prenatal endowments are larger. Given gaps in prenatal endowments, parents invest more in better-endowed children’s human capital when they educate their children to be more altruistic. When parents have more children, they educate children to be more altruistic. Hence, parental investment becomes more likely to reinforce gaps in children’s prenatal endowments in larger families. The empirical results suggest that the literature understates the degree of parental aversion to inequality among their children because of the omission of inter-sibling altruism.

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Nov 19 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Mapping the Three Generations of Economic Policy Elites in China: Trajectories, Networks and Institutions (1979-2013)

 

Yingyao Wang

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Sociology

Yale University

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

November 19, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
My paper investigates the organizational origin of economic ideas. It locates the formation of economic knowledge for Chinese economic policy elites in the organizations they served throughout the reform period (1979-2013). With social sequence and network analysis, it examines organizations and organizational fields by parsing the career trajectories of 191 Chinese economic officials divided into three generations. It argues that hegemonic or competing organizational views of the economy defined the knowledge regime for each generation of economic officials. These organizational views determine the kinds of economic strategies that each generation of economic officials proposed when they were in power.

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Nov 5 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Authoritarian Resilience Under Crisis: Geography and Redistribution in China

Jeremy Wallace

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

Ohio State University

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

November 5, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
How do authoritarian regimes survive economic crises? Contrary to modernization theory, analyses show that economic growth aids regime survival, while regimes are much more likely to end during crises. While different types of nondemocratic regimes and institutions account for much of the variation in regime survival, the policies that shape the political economy of these regimes have received less attention. Why did the global financial crisis and ensuing Great Recession not generate the political instability in China that many predicted? I argue that China’s success in weathering the storm was partly due to its long-term strategy of managed urbanization and migration paired with a short-term economic stimulus. These factors combined to structure, disperse, and reduce discontent generated by the Great Recession. Fearing instability and unrest among newly unemployed migrant workers along the coast, the regime sought to encourage employment in the interior. Along with continued collective ownership of land in the countryside and the hukou system, the fiscal stimulus facilitated stability by providing channels for those negatively affected by the crisis to return to the countryside and smaller cities in the interior, dispersing discontent. While the fiscal stimulus continued the regime’s pro-rural, pro-interior development policy, at the height of the crisis, the regime also vastly expanded loans to urban industries in contrast to its general move away from urban bias. The analysis demonstrates the utility of in-depth investigation of the threats that regimes face and their policy responses to those threats.

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Oct 22 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Mono to Dual Nationality: Restructuring the Legal Boundaries of Citizenship in Japan and Korea

Naeyun Lee

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

Oct 22, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

 

Abstract
Many scholars have noted the growing incongruence between the actual resident population and the national self-perception in liberal democratic states. Previous studies on the expansion of citizenship to non-citizens have attributed such changes to the global human rights regime, activist jurors and client politics, and the dynamics of policy-making. However, discussions on citizenship often neglect the recent increase in the number of countries that tolerate dual citizenship. In this paper, I use dual citizenship as an analytic tool to discuss the divergent paths that the two countries, Korea and Japan, have taken to realign their monoethnic nationality with the rapidly changing demographics of the state. By expanding the scope of analysis to non-Western countries, I attempt to test out whether convergence toward an international mean occurs in citizenship policies. I find that the preexisting theories of globalists and liberal-democratic accounts fail to provide adequate explanations on the sudden launch of a partial dual citizenship system in Korea in 2010 and the lack of political interest in Japan. I call for a closer look at the bureaucratic structure of the government as well as political regimes as key factors in inducing legal reforms in the citizenship laws.

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Oct 8 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Plural Interests, Political Affiliation and Parochial Identity: Explaining Popular Approval of Local Governments in China

Junyan Jiang

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

Oct 8, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Compared to how much we know about public opinion in democracies, very little is known about how governments are viewed and evaluated by citizens in authoritarian regimes. We develop an integrated model to explain popular approval of local governments in China based on three key factors: economic performance, political affiliation and leadership characteristics. We test our hypotheses against so far the largest dataset on Chinese local public opinion using a multilevel regression method. Our analysis yields three main findings: First, we find that expression of political preferences is heavily conditioned on socioeconomic status. High income group and urban residents display radically different preferences from the poor and the rural with respect to both investment and fiscal expansion. These disagreements interact with distinct policy portfolios of local governments to produce diverging performance evaluations. Second, political affiliation has an important but nonlinear effect on performance evaluation. While Party members and government-sector employees tend to be more supportive, public-sector employees give the lowest evaluations in the sample. Finally, in the absence of explicit partisan cues or other political cleavages, local leaders’ demographic attributes serves as a powerful cue when citizens are making evaluations.  Governments headed by local natives tend to receive much higher rating than those headed by outsiders, and female citizens show greater support in localities headed by female leaders.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Fall 2013 Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Fall 2013 Workshop Schedule

Oct 8

“Plural Interest, Political Affiliation and Parochial Identity: Explaining Popular Approval of Local Governments in China”

Junyan Jiang

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

Oct 22

“From Mono to Dual Nationality: Restructuring the Legal Boundaries of Citizenship in Japan and Korea”

Naeyun Lee

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

Nov 5

“Cities and Stability: Urbanization, Redistribution and Authoritarian Resilience in China”

Jeremy Wallace

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

Ohio State University

Nov 19

“Mapping the Three Generations of Economic Policy Elites in China: Trajectories, Networks and Institutions (1979-2013)”

Yingyao Wang

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Sociology

Yale University

Dec 3

TBD

Rebecca Myerson

PhD Candidate, Harris School of Public Policy Studies

University of Chicago

The workshop meets on alternate Tuesdays 4:30-6pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. Abstracts are available on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/. Questions and comments should be addressed to the coordinator: Junyan Jiang: junyanjiang@uchicago.edu

Faculty Sponsors:

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

Zheng Michael Song (Booth School of Business), Zheng.Song@chicagobooth.edu

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