Nov 4 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Governing on the Edge: State and Informal Housing in China and Brazil

 

Yue Zhang

Associate Professor

Department of Political Science

University of Illinois at Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

November 4, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

More than half of the world’s population lives in cities today and most of this expansion has occurred in urban centers of the Global South. One of the most important and common characteristics of urban growth in southern metropolises is the development of informal housing that falls outside of government control or regulation. The phenomenon of urban informality not only challenges our notion of what constitutes a city but also provides a unique lens to interrogate property ownership and state-society relations. Drawing from her ongoing book project, Yue Zhang will discuss the production and governance of informal housing settlements in China and Brazil. The study demonstrates that informality must be understood not as the object of state regulation but rather as produced by the state itself. In contrast to the standard dichotomy between the formal and the informal, the study reveals the differentiation within informality. Different types of informal mobilization and informal politics in China and Brazil have shaped the urban land regime in various ways, eventually creating different forms of informal housing.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

The East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society and the Chicago Chinese Social Research Group Present:

Reporting From China: A Conversation with David Barboza, New York Times Shanghai Correspondent

Date: Friday, October 24th, 2014, 4:30 – 6pm
Location: The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, Lecture Hall (room 142), 1155 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

This event is free and open to the public. Please R.S.V.P. online at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1TOaN1sql6q_y52EJzvFQ3NTFgESYXbzNNp9vpb7gEUg/viewform by 5pm on October 22nd.

For inquiries, email Wen Xie at wxie@uchicago.edu. Persons with disabilities who may need assistance should contact the Office of Programs & External Relations at 773-753-2274 in advance.

Oct 21 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Settling Symbolic Battles in Workplaces: The Spatial Dynamics of Organizational Responses to Institutional Demands

 

Yuhao Zhuang

Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

October 21, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

The study of organizational responses to institutional demands has been a central concern of organizational sociology. This article examines the mobilization of response strategies in organizations and asks: Under what conditions would organizations fail to respond to external institutional pressures? Data from a two-year ethnography of two Chinese grassroots voluntary groups provide answers and reveal that organizational members were engaged in “symbolic battles” in which these actors perceived an external demand from a state agency differently according to their relevant previous work experiences and strengthened their own perceptions by attaching symbolic meanings to others’ viewpoints. Organizations were more likely to escalate the symbolic battles and discourage the mobilization of organizationally accepted responses when the departments of organizations were spatially isolated from each other. In this circumstance, the spatially fragmented workplace could unify opinions in each department while inhibiting effective negotiations across different departments. These findings advance current understandings of micro-level institutional change by discovering how divergence of members’ opinions and spatial arrangement of workplace may affect response-making processes within organizations.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Oct 7 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Lying or Believing? Measuring Preference Falsification from a Political Purge in China

 

Junyan Jiang

PhD Student, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

October 7, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

 

Abstract

Despite its wide usage in explaining some nontrivial dynamics in nondemocratic systems, preference falsification remains an empirical myth for students of authoritarian politics. We provide to our knowledge the first quantitative study of preference falsification in an authoritarian setting using a rare coincidence between a major political purge in Shanghai, China, and the administration of a nationwide survey in 2006. We construct two synthetic measures for expressed and actual support from a set of survey questions, and track the changes in these measures before and after the purge. We find that a dramatic increase in expressed support was paralleled by an equally evident decline in actual support in post-purge Shanghai. We interpret this divergence as evidence for the presence of preference falsification. We further find that the variations in the degree of preference falsification are jointly predicted by one’s access to one’s information environment and his/her structural vulnerability to state sanctions. Using two additional surveys conducted over the span of a year, we further show that there was substantial deterioration in political trust in Shanghai six months after the purge, which suggests that falsification could not sustain public support in the long run.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Autumn 2014 Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Autumn 2014 Workshop Schedule

 

October 7

“Lying or Believing? Measuring Preference Falsification from a Political Purge in China”

Junyan Jiang

PhD Student, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

October 21

“Settling Symbolic Battles in Workplaces: The Spatial Dynamics of Organizational Responses to Institutional Demands”

Yuhao Zhuang

Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences

University of Chicago

November 4

“Governing Art Districts: State Control and Cultural Production in Contemporary China”

Yue Zhang

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

University of Illinois at Chicago

November 18

“ ‘It works because it works badly’: Meaning of Business Trip in Sino-Korean Food Trade”

Heangjin Park

PhD Student, Department of Anthropology

University of Chicago

December 2

“Social Mobility and Revolution: The Impact of the Abolition of China’s Civil Service Exam System”

Ruixue Jia

Assistant Professor, School of International Relations and Pacific Studies

University of California, San Diego

The workshop meets on alternate Tuesdays 4:30-6pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. Abstracts are available on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/. Questions and comments should be addressed to the coordinator Wen Xie: wxie@uchicago.edu

Faculty Sponsors:

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

Zheng Michael Song (Booth School of Business), Zheng.Song@chicagobooth.edu

 

Feb 25 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Cramming a Way Out: The Organizational Transformation of Shadow Schools in China

Le Lin

Ph.D Student Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

February 25, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Coming out of the working draft of my dissertation proposal, this presentation aims at clarifying the research questions and generating hypotheses that can guide my fieldwork. My dissertation project investigates the organizational transformation of Chinese shadow schools from 1980 to 2010. A chronology of the changes at the institutional and organizational field level is delineated in the first place. Based on this chronology and other organizational level data, I show that this field which used to abound exclusively with small ‘fruit flies’ schools has transitioned into one in which a few leading brands play influential and even dominant roles. Several leading schools have evolved into new organizational forms of large bureaucratic for-profit and even publicly-traded corporate groups. My research question, therefore, is why, given the unfavorable institutional environments, formerly charismatic and patriarchic leader and teachers and especially star teachers’ resistance to bureaucratization and threat to the survival of schools, the new organizational form emerged. A short literature review is provided and relevant alternative explanations are discussed. I propose my hypotheses and research design at the end.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Feb 11 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

The Lasting Impact of Parental Early Life Malnutrition on Their Offspring: Evidence from the China Great Leap Forward Famine

Belton Fleisher

Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics

Ohio State University

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

February 11, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
We explore whether the second generation’s level of schooling is negatively impacted by their parents’ malnutrition in utero, using the China Famine as a natural experiment. We find that famine-induced  mother’s malnutrition reduced second generation male and female entrance into junior secondary school by about 5-7 percentage points. We measure famine severity with provincial excess death rates instrumented by measures of adverse climate conditions. Our findings indicate the existence of an important second-generation multiplier of policies that support the nutrition of pregnant women and infants in any country where nutritional deficiencies remain today.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Jan 28 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

How the Internet Affects Overseas Chinese Political Activism in China

David Benson

PhD candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

January 28, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Political activism in China is an important and well-studied phenomenon. One less well understood aspect of Chinese political activism, however, are overseas activists within the Overseas expatriate community. Innovations in communication technology, such as the internet, have recently made communication over great distances comparatively cheap. The decrease in cost of long distance communication has led some observers to conclude that the overseas community might be able to capitalize on their locations, utilizing cheap long-distance communication to affect political change in China. This article, which forms a summary of several sections of my dissertation which are still in development, examines the role of the internet in mobilizing overseas Chinese for activism within China. I argue that because transnational activism is inherently high-risk, with low probability of reward, most transnational activists are parts of robust social groups which provide social and emotional motives and support for the high risk activism. Since robust social networks are a function of strong ties, which are usually built in person, the increase in weak ties, over the internet, will have little effect on the generation of real world political activity. However, pre-existing groups will be able to utilize new media communications to their own advantage, just not to increase real-world political activism.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Jan 14 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Migration, Child Development and Government Policy in China

Rebecca Myerson

PhD candidate, Harris School of Public Policy

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

January 14, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
According to recent estimates, there are over 260 million people migrating for work within China, and about 70% of their children live apart from one or both parents. Due to the unique hukou (residential permit) system in China, access to government social services for children varies widely by location and migration status. In order to capture how parents make migration decisions and the implications for child development and policy, I developed a simple structural model based on the Solon (2004) extension of Becker and Tomes (1979). In the model, parents care about their own current consumption and their child’s future earnings; they can choose between three migration scenarios (migrating and bringing their child, migrating and leaving their child behind, or staying in the rural area), and they can choose their levels of time and monetary investments in their child. I analyzed possible changes in government policy and corresponding parental reactions including changes in migration, time and monetary investment. More detailed predictions can be developed in future drafts. I find that possible changes in government policy vary in their effects on rural hukou children. Increasing government monetary investment in children in rural areas does not necessarily yield a positive influence on them. In contrast, raising governmental support for migrant children in urban areas increases parental time investment without decreasing total monetary investment in children, and is the best policy considered in this paper.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Dec 3 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Endogenous Altruism: Theory and Evidence from Chinese Twins

 

Junjian Yi

Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Economics

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

December 3, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
In this paper, I investigate the endogenous formation of inter-sibling altruism and its implications for intra-household investment in children’s human capital. The theoretical analysis shows that parental fostering of inter-sibling altruism during childhood serves as a device to ameliorate commitment constraints within families. The increase in inter-sibling altruism enhances total returns from intra-household investment in children’s human capital by allocating more resources to better-endowed children, and decreases inequality in the distribution of consumption among children via inter-sibling transfers. Theoretical predictions are supported by the empirical results that are based on the Chinese longitudinal child twin survey. I find that parents are more likely to educate their children to be altruistic toward one another when gaps in children’s prenatal endowments are larger. Given gaps in prenatal endowments, parents invest more in better-endowed children’s human capital when they educate their children to be more altruistic. When parents have more children, they educate children to be more altruistic. Hence, parental investment becomes more likely to reinforce gaps in children’s prenatal endowments in larger families. The empirical results suggest that the literature understates the degree of parental aversion to inequality among their children because of the omission of inter-sibling altruism.

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

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