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March 6 – Regula Qureshi at EthNoise!

Please join us on Thursday, March 6 for a discussion with Regula Qureshi about her ongoing work translating a nineteenth-century Urdu music treatise, Ma’dan-ul-Musiqi (Mine of Music). See below for a brief note about the project from Prof. Qureshi.

As always, we will meet at 4:30pm in Goodspeed 205. Our workshop is open to the public and all are welcome.

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Discovering a Mine of Music (Ma’dan al Musiqi 1956), is a barely explored 19th c. treatise of Indian music that challenges the translator with its Persianized Urdu, and its multivocal use of Persian, Hindi and Sanskrit. 

 
Written by a Lucknow courtier who also held a British colonial post this highly syncretic work is modeled on musicological treatises of past centuries while richly chronicling current oral tradition oral traditions and musical practices in Sanskrit and Persian interpretive frames. It is also a connoisseur’s personal chronicle of the courtly musical life cut off by the British destruction oft he Lucknow Court while also contributing to their  agenda to make classical cultural knowledge accessible through vernacular texts. Part of this effort was the 1925 publication of the treatise   (Hindustan Press), through local  Muslim efforts.
 
I look forward to outline the challenge of this work, in the hope to receive critiques and ideas in a open-ended EthNoise! discussion.

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February 26 – Will Faber at EthNoise!

Please join us on tomorrow, February 26 for a paper and discussion with Will Faber. The paper is entitled “Acid Diversions: Race, Memory, and Mediation on the UK Dancefloor” Please find an abstract below.

As always, we will meet at 4:30pm in Goodspeed 205. Our workshop is open to the public.

 

Abstract       

The racialized borders of electronic dance music in Britain are routinely contested by musicians, dancers, and critics alike. Often framed as interlocking debates over subgenre, ethics, and history, I argue that these decades-long dialectics of inclusion and exclusion actively participate in the making and unmaking of race, both on and off the dance floor; and in turn help to assemble the very meaning of electronic dance music. Building on my ethnographic work with musicians and dancers in London, I engage their accounts of belonging, ownership, and value by focusing this paper on the ways that two relatively high-profile events are interpreted and mobilized by my interlocutors: the 25th anniversary celebration of Warp Records at Tate Britain in 2013, and Mark Leckey’s film installation Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore at the Serpentine Gallery in 2011.  Both events foreground the work of memory, trafficking in existing tropes of “1990‘s rave nostalgia” and playing across representations of individual and collective experience.  Furthermore, I discuss how these events intervene on existing histories of electronic dance music by creating critical environments in which musical practices often regarded as peripheral to electronic dance music- namely, reggae sound systems, northern soul, and working-class brass bands- are in turn placed at their narrative-historical center. Moving out from the space of the gallery and back to the studio and dancefloor, I conclude by considering the ways that groups of electronic dance music producers have in turn assembled complementary and competing ideas of their own musical past.

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February 19 – Peter Manuel

Please join us on Thursday, February 19 for a paper and discussion with Peter Manuel. The paper is entitled “World Music and Activism Since the End of History (sic).” Please find an abstract below.

As always, we will meet at 4:30pm in Goodspeed 205. Our workshop is open to the public.

 

Abstract       

While the decline of protest music in the USA has often been noted, a global perspective reveals that progressive, activist protest musics occupied lively niches in many music cultures worldwide (e.g., of Jamaica, India, Spain, Latin America) during similar periods, roughly the 1950s-80s.  While on one level these music movements were embedded in particular socio-political movements, on a broader level they reflected an ardent commitment to the secular universalist ideals of the Enlightenment.  The subsequent dramatic decline of all these protest musics—roughly since Fukuyama’s much-debated “end of history”—reflects a broader transformation of global political climate.  This transformation has both salutary aspects—notably the spread of democracies—and dismaying ones, notably the decline of Enlightement metanarratives and their replacement by new tribalisms, which have found their own passionate expression in music.

 

 

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February 5 – Daniel Gough

Please join us on Thursday, February 5 at 4:30pm, (Goodspeed 205) for our third workshop of the Winter Quarter.

We will discuss  Daniel Gough‘s chapter, “Music and Access in São Paulo’s Cultural Policy Worlds.”Ameera Nimjee will serve as discussant for the workshop session. In order to make our discussion most productive, participants are encouraged to read the chapter in advance. (Check your email for the password and link or email wdbuckingham@uchicago.edu).

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January 29 – Marion MacLeod

Please join us on Thursday, January 29 at 4:30pm, (Goodspeed 205) for our second workshop of the Winter Quarter.

We will discuss  Marion MacLeod‘s paper, “Risk and Reward: Alcohol and Irony in Acadie.” Laura Turner will serve as discussant for the workshop session. In order to make our discussion most productive, participants are encouraged to read the chapter in advance. (Check your email for the password and link or email wdbuckingham@uchicago.edu).

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January 22, 2015: Michael O’Toole at EthNoise!

Michael O’Toole will read his paper, “‘Gedanken sind frei’ to ‘No Pegida': Music In, With, and Against the Pegida Demonstrations in Germany,” followed by discussion. As always, EthNoise! meets Thursdays at 4:30pm in Goodspeed Hall, room 205. Please find Michael’s abstract below.

Beginning in October 2014, the recently founded organization known as Pegida (“Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West”), has held weekly demonstrations every Monday in Dresden, inspiring similar demonstrations and counter-demonstrations in other cities across Germany. Motivated by fear of an “Islamization” of Germany and the country’s growing efforts to address a recent surge in refugees and asylum seekers, the Pegida demonstrations have grown from a few hundred participants in October to approximately 25,000 at the most recent demo on January 12. In this presentation, I will discuss the variety of ways in which music has played a role in the nation-wide debate sparked by the Pegida demonstrations. Drawing on examples from social media, I will consider the role of music, sound, and silence within the demonstrations themselves, as well as consider several examples of music as a medium for supporting, protesting, or satirizing the Pegida movement and its significance. 

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EthNoise! Winter 2015 Schedule

Winter 2015 Schedule

January 22: Michael O’Toole – “‘Everyone Longed for Music': Narratives of Music, Memory, and Migration in Post-Reunification Germany”

January 29: Marion MacLeod – “Risk and Reward: Alcohol and Irony in Acadie”

February 5:  Daniel Gough – “Music and Access in São Paulo’s Cultural Policy Worlds”

February 19: Peter Manuel – “World Music and Activism Since the End of History (sic)”

February 26: Will Faber – “Acid Diversions: Race, Memory, and Mediation on the UK Dancefloor”

March 5: Regula Qureshi

March 19: Monica Hairston O’Connell

 

Unless otherwise noted, all workshop meetings are on Thursdays from 4:30-6pm in Room 205, Goodspeed Hall, University of Chicago campus.

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Thursday, December 11 – Genevieve Dempsey

Please join us for our final meeting of the Autumn Quarter. This Thursday, we’re excited to welcome our own Genevieve Dempsey for a presentation entitled  “The Sacred Sound of Congado: A Revival of Afro-Brazilian Religiosity” (Please see below for Genevieve’s abstract).

As always, we will meet from 4:30-6:00pm in Goodspeed 205. We look very much forward to seeing you!

 

Abstract
This presentation explores how Afro-Brazilians involved in congado, a traditional music of popular Catholic religiosity, become empowered through sacred song. By sounding congado they succeed in expressing their faith to Nossa Senhora do Rosário (Our Lady of the Rosary), remembering the past, and revitalizing a tradition that speaks to their identity as Afro-Brazilians. To what extent do musical participants respond to social and racial injustices with dancing, singing, and drumming so as to ensure their physical and mental survival? My work investigates the ways in which congadeiros use music as an instrument for voicing faith and creating dignity.

 

 

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Thursday, November 20 – Thomas Hilder

Please join us for our penultimate meeting of the Autumn Quarter. This Thursday, we’re excited to welcome Thomas Hilder for a presentation entitled  “Sámi Musical Performance, Indigeneity, Cosmopolitanism.” (Please see below for Thomas’ abstract and bio).

As always, we will meet from 4:30-6:00pm in Goodspeed 205. We look very much forward to seeing you!

 

Abstract
My paper explores the politics of cosmopolitanism in musical performance of the Sámi of northern Europe. Through a post-WWII political and cultural movement, the Sámi have highlighted their history of Christianisation, land dispossession and cultural assimilation, whilst working towards Sámi political self-determination within and across the Nordic states and Russian Kola Peninsula. Participation by Sámi activists, academics and artists at international indigenous meetings since the 1960s not only helped strengthen articulations of indigeneity at home, but also led to the Sámi playing an important role in campaigning for global indigenous rights (Minde 2008, 1996). Sámi musical performance, often drawing on the distinct unaccompanied vocal practice of joik, has strengthened political articulations, assisted wider cultural revival, as well as facilitated inter-indigenous cultural and political exchange.

Based on multi-sited ethnographic research, I will explore the challenges, potentials and contradictions of Sámi musical cosmopolitanism. Firstly, I investigate the participation by Sámi joikers at international indigenous meetings and the impact of these inter-indigenous encounters on Sámi musical performance. I then analyse the Sámi singer Mari Boine to unearth the ways in which aesthetic and political indigenous solidarity has been articulated. Finally, I examine the role of the Riddu Riđđu Indigenous Peoples’ Festival in forging a global indigenous network. By drawing on political and postcolonial theory (Ivison, Patton & Sanders 2000), and the literature of cosmopolitanism (Delanty 2009; Forte 2010; Feld 2012) I ask: how might Sámi musical performance propose alternative models for transnational collaboration and geo-political organisation?

 

Thomas Hilder is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for World Music, University of Hildesheim, after having completed his PhD in ethnomusicology at Royal Holloway, University of London in 2010. His main research area is the popular music of the Sámi, of northern Europe, with a particular interest in postcolonialism, digital media and transnationalism. He is author of the forthcoming monograph Sámi Musical Performance and the Politics of Indigeneity in Northern Europe (Rowman and Littlefield), and is co-editor of the book projects Music, Indigeneity, Digital Media and Music and Cultural Memory in Post-1989 Europe: Sounding Contested Past(s). In addition, he teaches courses on Nordic music, music and politics, and music and gender at the University of Hildesheim and Humboldt University, Berlin, he co-organises the annual doctoral workshop in ethnomusicology at the Center for World Music, and co-runs the Berlin ethnomusicology research group BEAM.

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Thursday, November 6 – SEM Dry Runs (Part 2)

Please join us for the second of two workshops in which students will present their conference papers in preparation for the Society for Ethnomusicology conference. This Thursday, we’re excited to hear Meredith Aska McBride, and Michael O’Toole. (Please see the abstracts below).

As always, we will meet from 4:30-6:00pm in Goodspeed 205. We look very much forward to seeing you!

 

Single Moms and Tiger Moms: the Politics of Parenting in Chicago’s Music Education Programs (Meredith Aska McBride)

This presentation explores the contested politics of parenting in Chicago’s music education programs. I examine two competing, and equally imagined, parental models implied by different types of programs: the low-income “single mom” who is unable to meet her children’s educational and developmental needs, and the affluent, hyper-competitive “tiger mom” who uses music education as one weapon in an arsenal of intensive parenting tools. Both of these models are, of course, inaccurate in various ways and are gendered, raced, and classed. My paper explores how these models shape program design, funding, and curriculum and the ways in which parents, students, and program staff work within and against these parental specters. I further connect these politics of parenting to ongoing public and academic discourses of urban citizenship.

 

“My personal longing to tell this story”: Anatolian Music and Armenian Silence in Marc Sinan’s Hasretim: An Anatolian Journey (Michael O’Toole)

Since the early twentieth century, composers of western art music in Turkey and its diasporas have frequently drawn on the diverse musics of Anatolia as a source of musical material and inspiration. Composers in the early years of the Turkish Republic often regarded the diversity of Anatolian musics as a problem to be overcome in creating a national school of composition. More recently, several composers have more explicitly embraced the pluralism inherent in the cultural, linguistic, and musical diversity of Anatolia. In this paper, I discuss the work of Marc Sinan, a German composer of Armenian and Turkish descent, who has engaged in several ways with Anatolian musics as a source of creative material, compositional inspiration, and transnational collaboration. I focus in particular on Sinan’s 2010 multimedia composition Hasretim: An Anatolian Journey, which involves multiple forms of collaboration between musicians in Armenia, Germany, and Turkey. Drawing on discussions with the composer, fieldwork at the debut performance in Dresden, and analysis of the concert film released by ECM, I discuss Sinan’s strategies for representing the presence and absence of Armenian music and culture in Anatolia, and how Sinan relates Hasretim to his own experiences as a descendent of survivors of the Armenian Genocide. Situating my analysis in ethnomusicological discussions of music and trauma, I discuss the ways in which Sinan creatively reworked his own ethnographic recordings of Anatolian musicians, shaping the images, sounds, and narratives of Hasretim to represent Anatolia as a site of both musical abundance and musical loss.

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