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Archive for April, 2008

EthNoise! Workshop, May 1: Bruno Nettl

Please join us for our fourth meeting of the Spring Quarter this Thursday, May 1, at 4:30pm in Goodspeed Hall 205. EthNoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop is extremely happy to welcome:

“Self-critique in Ethnomusicology: Comments on the History of a Tradition”

Bruno Nettl
Professor Emeritus of Musicology
University of Illinois School of Music

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Andrew Mall at 773-677-4410.

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EthNoise! Workshop, April 24: Gabriel Solis

Please join us for our third meeting of the Spring Quarter this Thursday, April 24, at 4:30pm in Goodspeed Hall 205. EthNoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop is extremely happy to welcome:

“Our Law: Aboriginal music and Dance, Cosmopolitan Australia, and the problem of ‘the traditional’”

Gabriel Solis
Assistant Professor of Musicology
University of Illinois School of Music

(Click title to download a .pdf of the circulated paper.)

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Andrew Mall at 773-677-4410.

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EthNoise! Workshop, April 15: Nathan Bakkum

Please join us for our second meeting of the Spring Quarter next Tuesday (note the irregular day), April 15, at 4:30pm in Goodspeed Hall 205. EthNoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop is proud to welcome:

“Things Ain’t What They Used To Be: Swingin’ Toward the Center with Count Basie’s All-American Rhythm Section”

Nathan Bakkum
PhD Candidate, Department of Music
University of Chicago

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Andrew Mall at 773-677-4410.

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Anthropology of Europe Workshop, April 10: Katalin Kovalcsik

CEERES and the Anthropology of Europe Workshop present:

Katalin Kovalcsik (Institute of Musicology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

“The Change of Storytelling in a Hungarian Vlach Romani Community from the 1980s to 2002″

Thursday, April 10, 2008
5:00 p.m.
Haskell 315

Reception to follow.

If you need assistance attending this talk, please contact CEERES at 773-702-0875.

Abstract: An analysis of tale telling in the Vlach Romani community in a northeastern village in Hungary will be drawn from recording sessions with Mihály Rostás, a Churari Vlach Romani man and other storytellers in the 1980s. In this village tale-telling in Romani was mainly a form of men’s entertainment. It became a community event through strict rules of behavior, through the use of a stock of elaborate speech formulas, and through compulsory audience participation. Women’s interpretation was reserved, and they concentrated on the essentials of the content. They could not tell stories at social gatherings where men were present. Women were important as storytellers mainly in the education of children. It was from the women that small children first heard simplified versions of the stories that they later learned from men to narrate at community events. The change of life style has altered the frame both of the public and private storytelling. People have told stories for children but the public storytelling has pushed to the background. At the same time the repertory changed as well. The new type of storytelling we can see on the vigil of Rostás in 2002 who was the last person telling stories on a traditional way. The lecture will be illustrated with video fragments.

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EthNoise! Workshop, April 3: Suzanne Wint

EthNoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop is pleased to announce the first meeting of the Spring Quarter, this Thursday, April 3, at 4:30pm in Goodspeed Hall 205:

“Classical Kampala: Expanding a Scene without an Infrastructure”

Suzanne Wint
PhD Candidate, Ethnomusicology
University of Chicago

Proponents of Western Classical music in Europe and the United States often advocate strengthening the “infrastructure” of classical music in order to build the dwindling audience. In Uganda, the classical audience has no classical radio stations, no shops in which to buy classical recordings, no professional symphonies or opera companies to do outreach in schools – in short, no “infrastructure” – yet it continues to expand along with a thriving performance scene. Based on fieldwork from 2006-2007, this paper investigates the mechanisms that drive the growth of classical music performance in Kampala. I consider the usefulness of the “scene” concept (T. Jackson, Becker, Goffman), while also revisiting work on kinship in Uganda (Fallers, Southwold), in identifying that which stands in for “infrastructure”. I also draw on media accounts and interviews with educators, performers, composers, government administrators and journalists, as well as knowledge won through participation in numerous performances, in assessing the applicability of Kittler’s theory of discourse networks to the shaping of both a discerning audience and an extraordinary amateur performance scene.

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Andrew Mall at 773-677-4410.

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