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Jan 26th, Nitasha Tamar Sharma

Please join us for an upcoming Ethnoise! workshop on Thursday, January 26th, at 4:30 in Goodspeed Hall, Room 402.

Dr. Nitasha Sharma (Assistant Professor of African American Studies and Asian American Studies at Northwestern University) will present a paper titled “Post-9/11 Brown: U.S. South Asian Rappers and a Critique of U.S. Empire.”

This talk draws from Dr. Sharma’s decade-long ethnographic research on South Asian American, or desi, hip hop artists. This multimedia presentation expands her book’s focus on South Asian/Black relations to a transnational scale by drawing upon recent examples of music made by desi rappers who make links with revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa. Dr. Sharma is an Assistant Professor of African American Studies and Asian American Studies at Northwestern University and she is the author of Hip Hop Desis (Duke University Press, 2010).

 

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Jan 12th, Nathan Bakkum

Please join us for our second Ethnoise! workshop of the quarter.

We welcome Nathan Bakkum (Director of Musicology, Columbia College Chicago).  He will present a paper titled:

“Out But In: Between Discourse and Practice in a London Jazz Quartet.”

The discourse surrounding the production of “authentic” jazz has long coded the music as a product of African-American communities, focused on apprenticeship and live performance as primary educational modes. This discourse marks American musicians as insiders while forcing improvisers of other nationalities into hyphenated, hybridized musical identities. For the young British jazz quartet Empirical, this outsider status has not halted a focused, sustained, personal engagement with the jazz tradition. The ensemble’s 2009 recording, Out ’n’ In, presents eleven performances based on the music of Eric Dolphy. Rather than presenting a repertory project, Empirical undertakes a modern re-imagining of Dolphy’s work, based on a consideration of the processes and relationships undergirding the original recordings. The group sidesteps the traditional apprenticeship model, looking to recordings as their primary sources for understanding of the tradition. While their outsider status informs their reverent, intimate relationship with their source materials, Empirical’s intense, practical study has led the group to a collective understanding of experimentation and play as central ideologies demonstrated within Dolphy’s music. Through ethnographic and musicological analysis, this article explores several ways in which Empirical bridges the gap between these discursive and performative worlds through their active engagement with the jazz canon.
Nathan Bakkum serves as Director of Musicology at Columbia College Chicago, where he teaches courses in music history and popular music studies (including rock, jazz, and hip-hop) and coordinates the department’s offerings in music history and music appreciation. He holds a Ph.D. in History and Theory of Music (2009) and an M.A. in Ethnomusicology (2006) from the University of Chicago, an M.Mus. (2002) in Double Bass from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a B.Mus. (1999) in Music Education from DePaul University.  His research interests include jazz historiography, the production and reception of musical recordings, and intersections between history and anthropology. As a bassist, he has studied with jazz legend Richard Davis and Chicago jazz stalwart Larry Gray.

Thursday, January 12, 4:30
Goodspeed Hall, Room 205

Persons who believe they may need assistance to participate in this event, please call Will Faber in advance at 773.987.5299.

 

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Jan 5th, Alisha Lola Jones

Please join us for the first Ethnoise! of the winter quarter.  Alisha Lola Jones (U Chicago) will present “‘This Prayer Is UnSpoken’: Breaking Silence and Negotiating Queerness in Black Gospel Performance.”

This paper examines performances and discourses of two gospel artists,
Ton3x and Jungle Cat, who embody longstanding tensions and
contradictions concerning queerness and black Christian identity.
Through a comparative description and analysis, I argue that these men
attempt to break the silence around issues of sexuality that persists
among gospel practitioners. Silence breaking is, in many ways, a
highly creative act through which these gospel artists launch
critiques and renegotiate their identities through social media.
Expressing a progressive black Pentecostal masculinity through musical
gesture and sound, they intentionally push boundaries of gender
identity while carving out new social and spiritual “homes” through
bodily performance. In so doing, they also give voice to “unspoken”
forms of gospel praise.

We will convene at 4:30 on Thursday, Jan 5th in Goodspeed 205.

Persons who believe they may need assistance to participate in this event, please call Will Faber in advance at 773.987.5299.

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Winter 2012 Schedule

Our winter 2012 schedule for Ethnoise! has been finalized and we are pleased to welcome a great group of presenters.

January 5-    Alisha Lola Jones, U Chicago
January 12-  Nate Bakkum, Columbia College Chicago
January 19-  Michael Gallope, U Chicago
January 26-  Nitasha Tamar Sharma, Northwestern
February 2-  Rachel Adelstein, U Chicago
February 9-  Kelly Askew, Michigan
February 23- Suzi Wint, U Chicago

We look forward to seeing you there.    As always, we will meet on Thursday afternoons at 4:30, in Goodspeed Hall, Room 205.

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Dec 8th, Michael O’Toole

We are excited to host Michel O’Toole, Phd Candidate in the Music Department at the University of Chicago on December 8th, at 4:30 in Goodspeed Hall, room 205.  He will present a paper titled  ‘”This is my therapy”‘: Learning, Practicing, and Rehearsing at the ‘Berlin Conservatory for Turkish Music.’”

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please email Will Faber in advance at wfaber@uchicago.edu

 

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Nov 10th, Alisha Lola Jones and Rachel Adelstein

Please join us for Ethnoise! the Ethnomusicology Workshop on Thursday, November 10th, at 4:30 in Goodspeed Hall, Room 205 for presentations by University of Chicago graduate students Alisha Lola Jones and Rachel Adelstein.  They will dry-run papers prepared for the upcoming Society for Ethnomusicology/ Congress on Research in Dance Annual Meeting.

Alisha Lola Jones will present “Pole Dancing for Jesus: Gesture, Masculinity and the Circus of Sexual Ambiguity in Gospel Performance.”

Rachel Adelstein will present “City of Sisterly Love: The Women Cantors Network Conference As a Site Of Feminine Spirituality.”

We look forward to seeing you there.
Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Will Faber in advance at 773-987-5299.

 

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October 7th, Dr. Gerhard Kubik

Please join us for a specially scheduled Ethnoise! the Ethnomusicology Workshop on Monday, November 7th, at 4:30 in Regenstein Library, Room 264 for a presentation by Dr. Gerhard Kubik. He will discuss his current research on African and African-American musics and cultures.

Dr. Kubik is a cultural anthropologist, ethnomusicologist, and psychoanalyst. He is a professor of ethnology and African Studies at the Universities of Vienna and Klagenfurt, and also teaches at Sigmund Freud University in Vienna. He is affiliated with the Oral Literature Research Programme, Chileka, Malawi, and is a permanent member of the Center for Black Music Research in Chicago and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, London.

Dr. Kubik has conducted extensive fieldwork throughout Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas, including Angola, Zambia, Malawi, Uganda, Venezuela, Brazil, and the United States. He is the author of numerous books and articles including Theory of African Music Vol 1 and 2 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2010), Africa and the Blues (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1999), and Tusona- Luchazi Iideographs: A Graphic Tradition of West-Central Africa (Wein: Lit-Verlag, 2006).

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Will Faber in advance at 773-987-5299.

 

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November 3- Aaron Cohen

Please join us for Ethnoise! the Ethnomusicology Workshop on Thursday, November 3rd, at 4:30 in Goodspeed 205 for a presentation by Aaron Cohen entitled “Aretha Franlkin’s Amazing Grace.”

Aaron Cohen is the reviews editor of DownBeat and his articles have also appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Oxford American and Rolling Stone. He received his master’s degree from the University of Chicago’s Department of Latin American and Caribbean Studies where his thesis was on the music and culture of the Garifuna people of Belize.

Aaron will speak about his new book about Aretha Franklin’s 1972 gospel album, Amazing Grace.   Along with discussing Franklin’s performance and the work of her musical colleagues, he will emphasize the album’s role in transforming gospel music, its part in the era’s cultural movements, as well as its lasting influence.

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Will Faber in advance at 773-987-5299.

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October 13- Dr. Mark Butler

Please join us for Ethnoise! the Ethnomusicology Workshop on Thursday, October 13th, at 4:30 in Goodspeed 205 for a presentation by Dr. Mark Butler, a music theorist whose research addresses popular music, rhythm, and technologically mediated performance. He is an Associate Professor and Coordinator of the program in Music Theory and Cognition in the Bienen School of Music at Northwestern University.

His paper is:  “Performing Performance: Communicative Strategies, Ideologies of Liveness, and Listener Orientation among Electronic Dance Musicians.”

Abstract:  In DJ sets and laptop performances, an unprecedented level of technological mediation comes into conflict with the expected “liveness” of performance. As a result, musicians frequently express various techno-performative anxieties in explanations of their approaches. In particular, they are concerned that the audience experiences a performance, one that is imbued with a sense of live presence, rather than simply the playback of a recording or the clicking of a mouse. They work to convey this “presence” in a number of ways, which include dancing, other significant physical gestures, and the use of carefully selected electronic hardware. The audience responds in kind, thereby completing the liveness of the event.  My talk will address these issues in both theoretical and analytical terms, drawing material for discussion from interviews and field recordings made in Berlin in 2005–2007.


Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Will Faber in advance at 773-987-5299.

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October 6th- Bob Riesman

Please join us for our second Ethnoise! workshop of the fall quarter on Thursday, October 6th, at 4:30 in Goodspeed Hall, Room 205.  Bob Riesman will present material related to his new book I Feel So Good: The Life and Times of Big Bill Broonzy (University of Chicago Press).

A major figure in American blues and folk music, Big Bill Broonzy (1903–1958) left his Arkansas Delta home after World War I, headed north, and became the leading Chicago bluesman of the 1930s. His success came as he fused traditional rural blues with the electrified sound that was beginning to emerge in Chicago. This, however, was just one step in his remarkable journey: Big Bill was constantly reinventing himself, both in reality and in his retellings of it. I Feel So Good traces Big Bill’s career from his rise as a nationally prominent blues star, including his historic 1938 appearance at Carnegie Hall, to his influential role in the post-World War II folk revival, when he sang about racial injustice alongside Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel. Riesman’s account brings the reader into the jazz clubs and concert halls of Europe, as Big Bill’s overseas tours in the 1950s ignited the British blues-rock explosion of the 1960s.

Bob Riesman is co-editor of Chicago Folk: Images of the Sixties Music Scene: The Photographs of Raeburn Flerlage. he produced and cowrote the television documentary American Roots Music: Chicago, and was a contributor to Routledge’s Encyclopedia of the Blues.

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please call Will Faber in advance at 773-987-5299.

 

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