Genevieve Godbout – Oct 16th, 4:30pm, H315

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to announce its first workshop of the year.

Thursday, October 16th
Haskell 315

In which there will be a presentation by-
Geneviève Godbout- PhD Candidate

Department of Anthropology

University of Chicago

 

Luxury: a view from British Colonial Antigua, 1783-1904

Tropical products, including sugar, turtles and pineapples from the Caribbean island of Antigua, were instrumental to the definition of “taste” in imperial Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth century.  In historical scholarship, “taste” is usually understood either in terms of metaphysical aesthetic judgement (following Kant) or in terms of consumer practice (e.g. Stahl 2002, Wilkie 2000) .  The rise of taste as a coordinate of social differentiation and as a particular mode of expertise in assemblage-making, was indeed rooted in the practices of material acquisition which characterized the period, including the profound transformations in food consumption and dining experienced in Metropolitain Britain at the time.  Nevertheless, archaeologists of British colonial contexts all too often fall back on price indexes and etiquette manuals printed in Britain (e.g. Soyer, Beeton 1861) to understand social distinction in domestic assemblages associated with settler households, glossing over the complex processes of cultural negotiation and innovation that were at work in the West Atlantic.   Using data from the kitchen yard of the Betty’s Hope Plantation site in Antigua and from the documentary archive relating to the management of the Estate between 1783 and 1904, this paper examines how the conceptual models that archaeologists deploy to make sense of white planter sociality in the Caribbean tend to rely uncritically on British metropolitan criteria of taste and on the ill-defined archaeological tope of “luxury good”. Implications for the study of British colonial societies in the West Atlantic more broadly are considered.

 

 

*******The Workshop Will be Followed by a Pubnight*******

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Autumn 2014 Schedule

We at IAW are proud to introduce an exciting new lineup for Fall 2014. Please come and join us at 4:30 Thursdays at Room 315 Haskell Hall.

 

Autumn Schedule:

 

October 16th “Luxury: a view from British Colonial Antigua, 1783-1904”

(Pubnight Following)

 

Genevieve Godbout

PhD Candidate

Department of Anthropology

University of Chicago

 

*Special Event*

co/sponsored with Semiotics Workshop

 

October 23rd “The Speaking Corpse: Evidential Regimes of Forensic                                                 Anthropology”

 

Zoe Crossland

Associate Professor of Anthropology

Columbia University

 

*Special Event*

 

November 6th “’Becoming-Animal’ at Chavín and Catalhoyuk”

 

Mary Weismantel

Professor of Anthropology/Gender and Sexuality Studies

Northwestern University

 

November 13th “’I Built a Port… and I Made them Trade with One Another':  Empire and Monetization on the Neo-Assyrian Periphery, c.900-  600 BCE”

 

Rob Jennings

PhD Candidate

Department of Anthropology and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

University of Chicago

 

December 4th“Rebels” and “Idolators” in the Valley of Volcanoes, 1000AD-1800AD An Archaeological and Historical Inquiry of Andagua, Peru.”

 

Alex Menaker

PhD Candidate

Department of Anthropology

University of Texas at Austin

 

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Elise MacArthur, May 22

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

Social Identity Studies and Their Applicability to the Teti Pyramid Cemetery in Middle Kingdom Egypt

IAW

Elise MacArthur
PhD Candidate, NELC

Thursday, May 22, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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Kathryn Bandy, May 8th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Institutions and Workers: Bridging the Gap Between Text and Archaeology at Tell Edfu”

Bandy IAW Image Edfu

Kathryn Bandy
PhD Candidate, NELC

Thursday, May 8, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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Dr. John Robb, Tues. April 29th, 4:30pm, H315

Robb

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Ways of Seeing” in Deep-Time Archaeology: New Theoretical Concepts in the Social History of “Art”  

Dr. John Robb
University of Cambridge

Tuesday, April 29, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

Robb2

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Elliot Blair, April 3

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Glass Beads, Global Itineraries, and Colonial Networks: An Archaeometric Approach to Social Networks in 17th Century La Florida”

Bead 13.11

Elliot Blair
PhD Candidate, Anthropology
University of California, Berkeley

Thursday, April 3, 2014
5:00 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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Brian Wilson (and Pub Night!), March 6th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Velha Goa as Object and Image: Cartography, Spatial Ontologies, and the Production and Use of Urban Landscapes in the Capital of the Estado da Índia

British Library f17 (1798) View of Old looking towards the NE showing Rosary church and New St Paul's SeminaryBrian Wilson
PhD Candidate, Anthropology

Thursday, March 6, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315
PUB NIGHT TO FOLLOW!

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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Hannah Chazin, February 20th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“The Life Assemblage?: Preliminary Thoughts on the Politics of Pastoralism”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Hannah Chazin

PhD Candidate, Anthropology

Thursday, February 20, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

Abstract: For many years, the idea of assemblages has been integral to zooarchaeological analysis, providing a way of tracing the impacts of human behavior and taphonomic processes through time. However, I suggest that the integration of domesticated animals – in particular herd animals – into human societies creates the possibility of, and the need for, particular acts of assembling of people, animals, and landscapes. The mixing of species, sexes, and ages in herds; practices of sharing and/or loaning animals; the distribution of labor around the herds; and the coordination of movements of groups of animals and humans all suggest ways in which herds themselves represent processes or loci for acts of assembling. Similarly, the foods derived from animals also play a role in acts of assembling involved in commensality. Feasts (as well as other less marked forms of consumption) are sites or moments of assembly – of people, food, and other materials.

This discussion starts by exploring taphonomy as a historically contingent (and not merely uniformitarian) process. In doing so, the logics of incompleteness and contingency fundamental to taphonomic analyses in zooarchaeology can be extended into the “life assemblage” itself. I argue that the political stakes of assemblings are two-fold. First, they produce the background of everyday, unremarkable practices of production, consumption and exchange. Second, assembling is also key to producing material, semiotic narratives of how things (and people) should be, that is, the production of discourses of power. I draw on zooarchaeological analysis of faunal remains from pastoralists societies in the Late Bronze Age South Caucasus as a case study. I suggest how analyzing pastoralism as acts of assembling – acts that produce both structures of practices and forms of meaning – can productively address the simultaneously economic and political stakes of the organization of pastoralist life.

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