Elliot Blair, April 3

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Glass Beads, Global Itineraries, and Colonial Networks: An Archaeometric Approach to Social Networks in 17th Century La Florida”

Bead 13.11

Elliot Blair
PhD Candidate, Anthropology
University of California, Berkeley

Thursday, April 3, 2014
5:00 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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Brian Wilson (and Pub Night!), March 6th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Velha Goa as Object and Image: Cartography, Spatial Ontologies, and the Production and Use of Urban Landscapes in the Capital of the Estado da Índia

British Library f17 (1798) View of Old looking towards the NE showing Rosary church and New St Paul's SeminaryBrian Wilson
PhD Candidate, Anthropology

Thursday, March 6, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315
PUB NIGHT TO FOLLOW!

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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Hannah Chazin, February 20th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“The Life Assemblage?: Preliminary Thoughts on the Politics of Pastoralism”

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Hannah Chazin

PhD Candidate, Anthropology

Thursday, February 20, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

Abstract: For many years, the idea of assemblages has been integral to zooarchaeological analysis, providing a way of tracing the impacts of human behavior and taphonomic processes through time. However, I suggest that the integration of domesticated animals – in particular herd animals – into human societies creates the possibility of, and the need for, particular acts of assembling of people, animals, and landscapes. The mixing of species, sexes, and ages in herds; practices of sharing and/or loaning animals; the distribution of labor around the herds; and the coordination of movements of groups of animals and humans all suggest ways in which herds themselves represent processes or loci for acts of assembling. Similarly, the foods derived from animals also play a role in acts of assembling involved in commensality. Feasts (as well as other less marked forms of consumption) are sites or moments of assembly – of people, food, and other materials.

This discussion starts by exploring taphonomy as a historically contingent (and not merely uniformitarian) process. In doing so, the logics of incompleteness and contingency fundamental to taphonomic analyses in zooarchaeology can be extended into the “life assemblage” itself. I argue that the political stakes of assemblings are two-fold. First, they produce the background of everyday, unremarkable practices of production, consumption and exchange. Second, assembling is also key to producing material, semiotic narratives of how things (and people) should be, that is, the production of discourses of power. I draw on zooarchaeological analysis of faunal remains from pastoralists societies in the Late Bronze Age South Caucasus as a case study. I suggest how analyzing pastoralism as acts of assembling – acts that produce both structures of practices and forms of meaning – can productively address the simultaneously economic and political stakes of the organization of pastoralist life.

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Haeden Stewart, Feburary 13th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Traces in the Desert: Mobility and Violence in the Borderlands”

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Haeden Stewart
PhD Student, Anthropology

Thursday, February 13, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

Abstract: Over the past twenty-five years millions of undocumented migrants have entered the United States on foot through the Sonoran Desert.  Due to the extreme harshness of the desert, and an extensive border security apparatus, thousands of migrants have died.  During this period the security buildup has expanded and increasingly incorporated the desert as a significant aspect of border security.  This project draws on archaeological survey data collected over the past three years to trace migrant mobility in the face of this security apparatus and understand how the nature of this mobility has changed in the past two decades. In this study I attempt to provide an example of how archaeological theory and method can be productively employed to study mobility and temporality, aspects that traditional ethnographic methodology is less suited towards, in a current migration.

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Dr. Zaijing Sun, February 6th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Tracing the Origin of Coffee by Photon Activation Analysis”Coffee

Dr. Zaijing Sun
Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Thursday, February 6, 2014
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

Abstract: Similar to Neutron activation analysis (NAA), Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) is a multi-elemental nuclear assay that has high accuracy, extreme sensitivity, and superiority in non-destructiveness. To make PAA more attractive and competitive, we scrutinized the underlying photonuclear physics, simulated the photon beam with Geant4, estimated the radioactivity of the sample before the irradiation starts, discussed the feasibility of the quasi-absolute method, and implemented an online computer program to facilitate the calculations. As a case study of PAA, we performed photon activation on coffee samples from several locations around the world as the initial step in assessing the relationship between trace elements in illicit drugs and the soils in which they were grown. The results show that coffees originating from different locations have different concentrations of certain trace elements. It is conceivable that the elemental content may serve as a means to “fingerprint” and thereby afford a way of tracing the origins of illicit drugs.

Dr. Zaijing Sun received his Ph.D. in applied nuclear physics from the Idaho Accelerator Center at the Idaho State University. He also has a master’s degree in Archaeometry from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC). His research interests focuses on applying nuclear analytical techniques to the study of archaeological, biological and environmental samples. Other research includes homeland security applications of photo-nuclear physics, computer simulation of the low energy accelerators, and medical isotope production by photonuclear reactions. Currently, he is a member of the Low Energy Accelerator Facility (LEAF) of the Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division at the Argonne National Laboratory.

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Kate Franklin and Dr. Tasha Vorderstrasse, February 5th

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The Oriental Institute and the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop (IAW)

 Cordially Invite You to a Brown Bag Lecture

“A Little Village on the Silk Road: Preliminary Excavations at Medieval Ambroyi, Armenia”

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Presented by

Kate Franklin and Dr. Tasha Vorderstrasse
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Wednesday, February 5, 2014

12:00pm LaSalle Banks Room

Light refreshments provided.

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IAW Schedule, Winter 2014

Winter 2014

January 30 – Organizational Meeting. Please join us at 4:30 pm in Haskell 315 for snacks and drinks as we host an open discussion about the future of the archaeology workshop.

February 5 (Wednesday) – Kate Frankin (Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology) and Dr. Tasha Vorderstrasse (Research Associate, Oriental Institute) – “A Little Village on the Silk Road: Preliminary Excavations at Medieval Ambroyi, Armenia” (To be held at noon in the LaSalle Banks Room of the Oriental Institute)

February 6 – Dr. Zaijing Sun (Argonne National Laboratory) – “Tracing the Origin of Coffee by Photon Activation Analysis”

February 13 – Haeden Stewart (Doctoral Student, Anthropology) – “Traces in the Desert: Mobility and Violence in the Borderlands”

February 20 – Hannah Chazin (Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology) – “The Life Assemblage?: Preliminary Thoughts on the Politics of Pastoralism”

March 6 – Brian Wilson (Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology) – TBA

All regular workshop events take place at 4:30 pm in Haskell 315 unless otherwise noted.

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Rozenn Bailleul-LeSuer, December 5th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Aviculture in Ancient Egypt: Maintenance and Breeding of Birds
in Captivity–Review of the Archaeological Evidence”

Davies-Geese_001

Rozenn Bailleul-LeSuer
PhD Candidate, NELC

Thursday, December 5, 2013
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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Lise Truex – November 14th

The Interdisciplinary Archaeology Workshop is pleased to present:

“Beyond the Northern Palace Walls: Two Household Perspectives on Living and Working in the Early Urban Landscape of Tell Asmar (ancient Eshnunna), Iraq”

Asmar 12 sculpture

Lise Truex
PhD Candidate, NELC

Thursday, November 14, 2013
4:30 p.m., Haskell Hall 315

Persons with a disability who believe they may be in need of assistance, please contact Sarah Adcock (adcock@uchicago.edu) in advance.

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