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2011-12 Schedule of Workshops

FALL QUARTER
3 October: Katharine Maus, the University of Virginia, Department of English (joint session with the Renaissance workshop, Early Modern workshop and the Nicholson Center for British Studies). “The Property of Friendship in the Merchant of Venice” from Being and Having in Shakespeare.
Discussant: Philip Goldfarb, Department of English Language and Literature.

19 October: Lee Cabatingan, The University of Chicago, Department of Anthropology. Cuban Disjunctures: Socialist Law in a Post-Soviet Society.
Discussant: Meghan Morris, Department of Anthropology.

8 November: Kris Peterson, University of California, Irvine, Department of Anthropology (joint session with the Medicine, Practice, and Body Workshop). On the Monopoly: Infrastructure, Drug Markets, and Intellectual Property in Nigeria.
Discussant: Justin Richland, Department of Anthropology.

30 November: Peter Lido, The University of Chicago, Department of English Language and Literature. Fantasies of Formalism: Gay Civil Rights and Legacies of Formalist Jurisprudence in Herman Melville’s Billy Budd
Discussant: Andrew Inchiosa, Department of English Language and Literature.

WINTER QUARTER
11 January: Rachel Jean-Baptiste, The University of Chicago, Department of History. “Faire Bon Ami” (To Be Good Friends): Sex, Instrumentality, Pleasure and Punishment.
Discussant: Caroline Schuster, Department of Anthropology.

24 January: Jean-Jacques Aubert, Universite de Neuchatel, Institut D’histoire (joint session with Ancient Societies). Roman Business Law.
Discussant: Tyson Leuchter, Department of History.

8 February: Brian Hembd, The University of Chicago, Law School. Judging the Effectiveness of Legal Protections for Transgender Individuals: A 50 State Survey of Employment Laws and Cases and their Effect on Transgender Employees.
Discussant: Darryl Heller, Department of History.

15 February: John F. Acevedo, The University of Chicago, Department of History. The Application of the Common Law During the Salem Witchcraft Trials.
Discussant: Dwaipayan Sen, Department of History.

22 February: Daniel Lee, The University of Toronto, Department of Political Science. “The Rights of Sovereignty and the Exercise Thereof”: The Civil-Law Origins of an Early Modern Constitutional Doctrine.
Discussant: No discussant this paper will be delivered.

7 March: Meghan Morris, The University of Chicago, Department of Anthropology. (joint session with the Caribbean Studies Workshop)Reconsidering the Lawless Land: Legal and Economic Ordering in Colombia’s Banana Region.
Discussant: Lee Cabatingan, Department of Anthropology.

14 March: Toussaint Losier, The University of Chicago, Department of History. “Black Power Through the Law”: the Afro-American Patrolmen’s League and the Politics of Police Accountability, 1968-1976 .
Discussant: John F. Acevedo, Department of History.

SPRING QUARTER

11 April: Deepa Das Acevedo, The University of Chicago, Department of Anthropology. Sovereignty Flux and the Case of Padmanabha’s Dasa, Kerala 1729-2011..
Discussant: Arvind Elangovan, Department of History.

18 April: 30 May: Fei-Hsien Wang, The University of Chicago, Department of History. Did Copyright Exist in China before the Copyright Law of 1910? Internationalizing Legal Norms in Local Contexts
Discussant: Deepa Das Acevedo, Department of Anthropology.

24 April: Dominique Charpin, University of Paris, section des Sciences historiques et philologiques, École pratique des hautes études. (Joint session with Ancient Societies Workshop). The Archives of Alammush-nasir. an Example of Estate Managing in Babylonia, 18th century BCE.
Discussant: NO discussant as this paper will be delivered.

3 May: Deepa Das Acevedo and John F. Acevedo, The University of Chicago, Department of Anthropology and Department of History. Neither Cosmopolitan nor Parochial; Foreign Law Citation in the United States.
Discussant: Robin D. Bates, Department of History.

16 May: Kathryn Goldfarb, The University of Chicago, Department of Anthropology. Law, blood, and other non-Durables: Theorizing the Temporality of Attachment in Japanese Child Welfare Placements.
Discussant: Eric Hirsch, Department of Anthropology.

23 May: Ke-chin Hsia, The University of Chicago, Department of History. Title TBA.
Discussant: TBA.

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