01
Dec 13

Winter schedule 2014

Although we have one more presentation this quarter (Dec 5, see last post for details), we are excited to now post the winter quarter schedule for the Social Theory Workshop!

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”

The following workshops will be held on Thursdays at 6pm.

Jan 16
“The dual character of paperwork in the Qing Empire’s treaty ports”
Stacie Kent
PhD Candidate
Department of History
University of Chicago

Jan. 30
“Duels in the European Novel: Class, Honor, and the Limits of a Bourgeois Form”
Ben Merriman
PhD Candidate
Department of Sociology
University of Chicago

Feb 13
“On the Impossibility of an International Left Movement in Europe”
Eli Thorkelson
PhD Candidate
Department of Anthropology
University of Chicago

Feb. 27
“Who are Choice Feminists? Competing Proposals for the Revival of Progressive Feminism”
Ashleigh Campi
PhD Student
Department of Political Science
University of Chicago

March 13
“A Crisis of Internalization: Jessica Benjamin, the Frankfurt School, and the Waning of the Oedipus Complex”
Benjamin Y. Fong
Harper Fellow in the Society of Fellows at the University of Chicago
and Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences Collegiate Division


17
Nov 13

Next workshop, Dec 5

Please join us for the next Social Theory Workshop, Thursday December 5 at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S Kenwood Ave).

“Ecological Crisis and the Capitalist Accumulation of Waste”

Michelle Yates
Assistant Professor, Cultural Studies Program
Department of Humanities, History, and Social Sciences
Columbia College Chicago

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”


10
Nov 13

Next Workshop, Nov. 14

Please join us for the next Social Theory Workshop, Thursday Nov. 14 at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S Kenwood Ave).:

“The Fragmentation of Leftist Politics in Pakistan: The Last Vestiges of the Legacy of the Old Left, 1948-1952″

Atiya Khan
PhD Candidate
Department of History
The University of Chicago

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”


06
Nov 13

Next Workshop Nov 7

Please join us for the next Social Theory Workshop, TOMORROW Thursday Nov. 7 at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S Kenwood Ave).:

“Color Inspections” and the Predicaments of Racism: The Use of Border Theory to Ethnographically Documenting Color Hierarchies among Mexicans in South Chicago”

Sergio Lemus
PhD Candidate
Department of Anthropology
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”

All events will take place at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S. Kenwood Ave)

 


27
Oct 13

Next Workshop Oct. 31

Please join us for the first meeting of the Social Theory Workshop for 2013-14, Thursday October 31 at 6pm:

“Hayek, Tradition, and the Abolition of Society”
Bob Reamer
Ph.D. Student
Department of Political Science
University of Chicago

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”

All events will take place at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S. Kenwood Ave)


04
Sep 13

Call for papers and Autumn Schedule

We now have an Autumn schedule that is nearly complete but we are also soliciting for presenters for Winter and Spring (We still have one session available in Autumn too!).

Those interested in presenting for the 2013-14 academic year should send an off-list email to Fabian Arzuaga, who will continue as coordinator next year. He can be reached at: arzuaga ["at" sign] uchicago.edu. In your email please indicate a preferred quarter or month to present and provide an indication of what sort of material you would be presenting (conference paper, dissertation chapter, dissertation proposal, journal article, book chapter manuscript, etc.).

We are soliciting proposals of work that explore issues in social theory across a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities.  The emphasis is less on developing social theory than on exploring in a sustained fashion the social theoretical implications of the participants’ work.  Themes to be addressed are likely to include the relationship between social and cultural transformations; the meaning, practices, and structures of work;  questions of the public sphere, civil society, and democracy; the relations between modernist and postmodernist forms of social theory;  the relation between colonialism and the global expansion of capital,and conceptual issues posed by globalization.

We look forward to seeing you all in the coming year.

—————-
Autumn 2013 Schedule:

The following workshops will be held on Thursdays from 6pm to 8pm. All papers will be distributed one week in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory.” All events will take place at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S. Kenwood Ave).

Oct 31:
Bob Reamer: “Hayek, Tradition, and the Abolition of Society”
Doctoral student
Department of Political Science
University of Chicago

Nov 7:
Sergio Lemus, “Color Inspections” and the Predicaments of Racism: The Use of Border Theory to Ethnographically Document Color Hierarchies among Mexicans in South Chicago”
Doctoral Candidate,
Department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Nov 14:
Atiya Khan, “The Fragmentation of Leftist Politics in Pakistan: The Last Vestiges of the Legacy of the Old Left, 1948-1952″
Doctoral Candidate
Department of History
University of Chicago

Dec 5:
Michelle Yates “Ecological Crisis and the Capitalist Accumulation of Waste”
Assistant Professor, Cultural Studies Program
Department of Humanities, History, and Social Sciences
Columbia College, Chicago
—————-


17
May 13

Next Workshop Monday May 27

Please join us for the final meeting of the Social Theory Workshop for the academic year, Monday May 27:

“Civilizing’ the Colonial Subject: Servitude, Slavery, and State Formation in Colonial South Carolina before the Stono Rebellion”
Daragh Grant, Society of Fellows, University of Chicago

The workshop will be immediately followed by the fourth annual Social Theory Workshop BBQ. To accommodate both events, the workshop will take place at 4pm, with the BBQ to follow. Food and drink will be provided. Feel free to bring extra beverages.

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”

Please take special note of the TIME and DAY: Monday May 27 at 4pm in Wilder House (5811 S. Kenwood Ave)


03
May 13

Next Workshop May 16

Please join us for the next meeting of the Social Theory Workshop, Thursday May 16

“The Nation-State Is Flat: Cadastral Mapping and Theories of State Formation”
Alvaro Santana-Acuña, Ph.D. Candidate, Sociology, Harvard University

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”

All events will take place at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S. Kenwood Ave)


28
Apr 13

Next Workshop: May 2 Ashleigh Campi

Please join us for the next meeting of the Social Theory Workshop, Thursday May 2     

“Can political theory think economic subjects? Psychoanalytic Contributions to a Theory of Neoliberalism”

Ashleigh Campi, Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science, University of Chicago

All papers will be distributed in advance of the workshops via the Social Theory Workshop list serv. To join this list serv go to: lists.uchicago.edu and search for “Social Theory”

All events will take place at 6pm in Wilder House (5811 S. Kenwood Ave)


19
Apr 13

Global Capitalism And The Crisis Of Work Conference

Global Capitalism And The Crisis Of Work

April 26 2013, 9:30 am–April 27 2013, 5:00 pm

Logan Center Performance Penthouse

http://ccct.uchicago.edu/events/global-capitalism-and-the-crisis-of-work/

The History, Social Theory, and Capitalism Project of the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory; the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture; The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality have convened a two-day conference on ” Global Capitalism and the Crisis of Work,” to be held at the University of Chicago on April 26 and 27, 2013. The conference will be devoted to the structural transformations of capitalism and of the world of work in recent decades. It will also investigate the relationship between these changes and the fortunes of various social movements, including those based on identities. Finally, it will ask about the future of work, itself.

Work and its social, cultural, and political problems have become increasingly peripheral to academic studies on both the theory and the practice of democratic politics and of social movements in recent decades. Ironically, this diminished interest in work – its history, meaning, political potential, and likely place in the future world – has occurred during a fundamental transformation of work and its social meaning that cries out for critical analysis.

From the 1830s to the 1970s, movements that sought to create more egalitarian or democratic societies focused largely on the problem of work. In retrospect, one can argue that the dual crisis of Fordist/Keynesian capitalism in the West and “actually existing socialism” in the East began a long-term structural decline of the industrial working class and, hence, of the social basis of working-class movements and their power. Over the ensuing decades, automation and industrialized agriculture have displaced labor in factory and field. Meanwhile, globalization has sent industrial production and service employment on an international search for low-cost non-unionized workers, but the relentless advance of automation has also begun to limit the growth of proletarian labor even in the low wage countries. However, the rise of automation and the declining salience of industrial work have not led to the emancipation from toil. Furthermore, the performance of work continues to be a condition for social and political belonging. This remains true even at present as the labor time has increased for some and been eliminated through long-term unemployment for many others.

These developments in the problem of work associated with neo-liberal global capitalism also have implications for understanding the contemporaneous rise to prominence of social movements focused on gender, race, nation, ethnicity, and sexuality. Academics have lately increasingly turned their attention to the racialized and gendered conceptualizations of categories and experiences of work and, more generally, to the relation of different populations historically to the uneven global development of capitalism. Nevertheless, the salience of these racialized and gendered patterns for the capitalist restructuring of work calls for further investigation. We believe it is time to rethink the relation of identity-based movements to the recent development of capitalism and to the structural transformations of work. Finally, the combination of rapid advances in technology and the urgent demands for restraint in order to preserve the global ecology asks how work and its socio-political significance will be transformed in the future.

The goal of this conference is to take stock of these transformations and to ponder their implications. We look forward to learning about your reflections on problems of work – including speculative reflections on the broader issues raised by the conference. It is our sense that a major rethinking of the problematic of work, its history, and its future prospects is overdue.

This event is sponsored by 3CT; The Center for The Study Of Race, Politics, and Culture; and The Center for The Study of Gender and Sexuality.

Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please email Parker Everett at peverett@uchicago.edu

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