SPRING 2014 SCHEDULE

Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia is proud present our schedule for Spring 2014:

All sessions will take place in the Cochrane-Woods Art Center (CWAC)
Fridays, 4:30-6:30
Room 156

Screen Shot 2014-03-25 at 下午1.16.44photo by Anne Feng 

Special Talk by Dunhuang Academy Delegation
April 3, Thursday, 4:30-6:30, Rosenthal Seminar Room, Regenstein Library rm. 133
“Images of Maheśvara from Dunhuang and Khotan and Related Issues”
(presentation in Chinese)
This event is sponsored by CEAS Committee on Chinese Studies, the Creel Center for Chinese Paleography.

April 4
Guo Weiqi (Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts)
残帖上石与残碑入帖:围绕《黄庭经》残本的几个问题
The Broken Yellow Court on Stone: Between Art History and Visual Culture

April 16
Anne Feng, Ph.D Student (University of Chicago)
Waters on the Wall: Illusionism, Meditation and the Making of Western Paradise Images in China and Central Asia, 7th – 8th century

May 2
Wei Zheng (Peking University)
“魏晋南北朝考古的基本问题”摘要
Fundamental Issues of Wei-Jin, Northern and Southern Dynasties Archaeology
(presentation in Chinese)

May 16
Stephanie Su, PhD Candidate  (University of Chicago, Art History)
Imagining the Orient: Nakamura Fusetsu’s Chinese Subject Painting

May 23
Lin Wei-cheng, Assistant Professor
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Chinese Temple of Art: Politics of the Chinese Art Collection during the 1930s and 40s through the Lens of the Nelson Gallery in Kansas City

May 30
Nancy Lin, PhD Candidate  (University of Chicago, Art History)
The Female Figure: Defining Beauty in Colonial Korea

 

 

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March 7 GU Yi

Friday, March 7, 3:30-5:30pm, CWAC 153

What Did Photography Do to Chinese Painting?

GU Yi
Assistant Professor of Art History
University of Toronto

 Zhu Shouren_Qujing

This presentation aims to illuminate a fundamental perceptual shift in Republican China through a close analysis of key art terms such as “view-taking”(qujing), “composition”(goutu), and “perspective”(toushi). These terms, still widely used in Chinese art writing to this day, were promulgated by the discourses and practices of art photography during the 1920s and 30s. The perceptual mode undergirding these terms had a great impact on the way guohua (traditional style painting) painters reconfigured their practices. Incompatibility between the grand vista of traditional monumental landscape painting and new optical knowledge based on Euclidean optics prompted guohua painters to develop new ways of depicting landscape as well as new understandings of the nature of painting. While modern Chinese art has often been categorized as a development arising from the tension between attempts at modernization inspired by the West and efforts to honor and preserve the tradition, the overlooked trajectories of these terms remind us how categories such as “the West” and “Chinese” were historical contingent constructions.

Friday, March 7, 3:00-5:00pm, CWAC 153
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

This event is a joint-workshop with Arts & Politics on East Asia (APEA)

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Feb 28 Quincy Ngan

Friday, February 28, 4:00-6:00pm, CWAC 153

To Frame, Highlight, and Cite Pictorial Motifs with Azurite:
Qiu Ying’s Polarizing Blue

Quincy Ngan
PhD Candidate
University of Chicago

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This chapter reveals that the 16th century painter Qiu Ying (ca. 1498-1552) often reserved azurite blue for the most important pictorial element in a composition; for example, he used the pigment to highlight motifs bearing stylistic references to ancient masters. However, since blue also appears elsewhere, the importance of what is highlighted is always camouflaged so as to carry differing messages to different audiences. For example, in one of his painting patronized by the Xiang family, azurite blue appears to highlight of motifs that reference to an actual ancient painting in the Xiang family’s collection. And yet, without broad understanding of ancient painting styles, this art-historical reference in this painting is hardly recognizable. Analyzing what pictorial elements are picked up by azurite blue in five paintings, this chapter shows that the blue mineral carries information about the artistic exchange between Qiu Ying and his elite contemporaries, as well as the fraternity between the three brothers of the Xiang family and their vanity and aspiration of being erudite scholars.

This sophisticated use of the blue pigment represents a self-conscious effort on the part of Qiu Ying and his patron to differentiate themselves from their contemporaries who produced and purchased heavily pigmented paintings, and to avoid such exhibitions of conscious consumption. This argument about sophistication, subtlety, and differentiation of Qiu Ying and his patron’s uses of blue is further supported by the evidence of other paintings discussed in this chapter. Even though these paintings were produced before Qiu Ying’s time, they too consciously use azurite blue as a way to add focal points to a painting and to subtly state one’s distinguish social status. Therefore they represent the earliest predecessors of Qiu’s practice.

 

Friday, February 28, 4:00-6:00pm, CWAC 153
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

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Feb 18 Wang Cheng-hua

*CAA Special Schedule*

Tuesday, February 18, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152

Art as Commodity: Business Practices Associated with Suzhou Single-Sheet Prints of the Qing Dynasty

Wang Cheng-hua
Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 下午10.15.13

This is a joint session with Arts and Politics with East Asia (APEA), supported by the Center for the Art of East Asia (CAEA).

Tuesday, February 18, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

 

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Special Session on Archaeology in Early China

 Tuesday, February 18, CWAC 156 11:00am-1:00pm
 
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TANG Jigen

Director, Anyang Archaeological Team
Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China

Public Archaeology in China: The Discovery of the Tomb of Cao Cao and the Surrounding Controversies

 

HWANG Ming-chong

Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

A Passage to ‘Monumentality': the Introduction of Bronze Technology via Eurasian Steppe and the Formation of Chinese Bronze Technology

This event is made possible by the faculty of Art History and EALC department, the Center for the Art of East Asia, and the Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia workshop.
 
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu
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Feb 17 Eleanor Hyun

*CAA Special Schedule*

Monday, February 17, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152

Hide and Seek: A Qianlong-period Curio Vessel

Eleanor Hyun
PhD Candidate
University of Chicago

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This workshop paper stems from a chapter of my dissertation that examines a curio vessel made for the Qianlong emperor (r. 1735-96). It is an exquisite example of Qing (1644-1910) craftsmanship, which is now classified as a duobaoge (“curio cabinet” or “display case”). Through an analysis of its form and content, I will discuss the curio vessel in relation to Qing display methods, through which link it to Qianlong’s larger collecting practices and cultural agenda.  As a vessel that is commonly referred to today as the “emperor’s toy,” this paper will also focus on the activity of enjoying objects and the mechanisms that incite and enhance amusement.

Monday, February 17, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

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Feb 11 Tuesday Ching-ling Wang

*CAA Special Schedule*

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152

Praying for Ten-thousand Goodness: On Ding Guanpeng’s The Buddha Preaching and Its Context in the Qing Court

Ching-ling Wang
Curator of Chinese Art
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

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The painting The Buddha Preaching in the collection of the Ethnological Museum, Berlin, is by far the largest painting produced by any of the Qing court artists. It measures 525 cm x 950 cm and depicts a scene of the Buddha preaching the dharma while surrounded by various Bodhisattvas, Arhats, Vajradharas, and other deities. It was painted in 1770 by Ding Guanpeng 丁觀鵬(?-1770?), one of the most important court painters in the 18th century. However, other than a few very short introductions, this painting has never been studied in detail, nor does it come up often when scholars discuss Ding Guanpeng’s work. This paper aims to reveal the artistic value of this much-overlooked painting, provide new research material for the field, and contextualize the function and meaning of this painting by considering its original location, and to reconstruct the impact of its institutional and religious contexts in the Qing court.

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

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Feb 7 Wu Hung

Friday, February 7, 4-6pm, CWAC 152

On Silk Hanging Paintings’ (Guafu 挂幅) and a Possible Prototype of the Hanging Scroll (Guazhou 挂轴)

Wu Hung
Harrie A. Vanderstappen Distinguished Service Professor of Art History
University of Chicago

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Friday, February , 4-6pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

 

 

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