Feb 11 Tuesday Ching-ling Wang

*CAA Special Schedule*

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152

Praying for Ten-thousand Goodness: On Ding Guanpeng’s The Buddha Preaching and Its Context in the Qing Court

Ching-ling Wang
Curator of Chinese Art
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

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The painting The Buddha Preaching in the collection of the Ethnological Museum, Berlin, is by far the largest painting produced by any of the Qing court artists. It measures 525 cm x 950 cm and depicts a scene of the Buddha preaching the dharma while surrounded by various Bodhisattvas, Arhats, Vajradharas, and other deities. It was painted in 1770 by Ding Guanpeng 丁觀鵬(?-1770?), one of the most important court painters in the 18th century. However, other than a few very short introductions, this painting has never been studied in detail, nor does it come up often when scholars discuss Ding Guanpeng’s work. This paper aims to reveal the artistic value of this much-overlooked painting, provide new research material for the field, and contextualize the function and meaning of this painting by considering its original location, and to reconstruct the impact of its institutional and religious contexts in the Qing court.

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

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Feb 7 Wu Hung

Friday, February 7, 4-6pm, CWAC 152

On Silk Hanging Paintings’ (Guafu 挂幅) and a Possible Prototype of the Hanging Scroll (Guazhou 挂轴)

Wu Hung
Harrie A. Vanderstappen Distinguished Service Professor of Art History
University of Chicago

 西壁1局部 2

Friday, February , 4-6pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

 

 

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Jan 24 Chelsea Foxwell

Friday, January 24, 4-6pm, CWAC 153

The Panned Out View:
The Illustrated Life of Ippen and the Visibility of Karma in Medieval Japan

Chelsea Foxwell
Assistant Professor
University of Chicago, Art History

Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 上午10.46.27

The Illustrated Life of the Holy Man Ippen (Ippen hijiri-e, 1299) by Hōgen En’i is distinct from other surviving medieval Japanese handscrolls of eminent monks thanks to a number of compelling visual characteristics. Most notably, its zoomed out, dehierarchized view of the Japanese landscape dwarfs the scrolls’ protagonist in almost every scene. This presentation reviews the circumstances behind the scroll set’s production and evaluates the rationales that scholars have previously offered for its distinctive mode of representation, including the paintings’ relationship to Song dynasty landscape painting. I then compare the scrolls with other, newly republished or reinterpreted paintings from the same period to offer an interpretation of the scrolls’ vantage point from the perspective of medieval Japanese Buddhism and visual culture.

Friday, January 24, 4-6pm, CWAC 153
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

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VMPEA WINTER SCHEDULE 2014

Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia is proud present our schedule for Winter  2014:

All sessions will take place in the Cochrane-Woods Art Center (CWAC)

2014-01-12 12.59.02Photo courtesy Wu Hung

Friday, January 24, 4-6pm, CWAC 153
Chelsea Foxwell, Assistant Professor (University of Chicago, Art History)
“The Panned Out View: The Illustrated Life of Ippen and the Visibility of Karma in Medieval Japan”

Friday, February 7,  4-6pm, CWAC TBA
Wu Hung (University of Chicago, Art History)
“On Silk Hanging Paintings” (挂幅)of the Tang.”

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CAA Special Schedule

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152 :
Ching-ling Wang, Curator of Chinese Art (Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam)
“Praying for Ten-thousand Goodness: On Ding Guanpeng’s The Buddha Preaching and Its Context in the Qing Court”

Monday, February 17, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Eleanor Hyun, PhD Candidate (University of Chicago, Art History)
TBA

Tuesday, February 18, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Wang Cheng-hua,(Academia Sinica, Taiwan)
“Art as Commodity: Business Practices Associated with Suzhou Single-Sheet Prints of the Qing Dynasty”
Joint-session with Arts and Politics of East Asia (APEA)

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Friday, February 28, 4-6pm, CWAC 153
Quincy Ngan, PhD Candidate (University of Chicago, Art History)
“Circa 1547: Qiu Ying’s Polarizing Blue”

Friday, March 7,  4-6pm, CWAC 152
Yi GU, Assistant Professor (University of Toronto, Art History)
TBA
Joint-session with Arts and Politics of East Asia (APEA)

 

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Dec.13 Micah Auerback

Friday, December 13, 4-6 pm, CWAC 152

Joint-session with East Asia: Transregional Histories (EATRH)
Paper will be available shortly on the website:
http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasiahistory/

Painting the Biography of the Buddha in Meiji Japan

Micah Auerback
Assistant Professor
University of Michigan, Asian Languages and Cultures

Discussants:
Helen Findley (Ph.D. candidate, EALC)
Nancy Lin (Ph.D. canditate, Art History)

TBA

 

Friday, December 13, 4-6 p.m.  CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

 

 

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Dec.6 Akiko Walley

Friday, December 6, 4-6 pm, CWAC 156

This workshop will pre-circulate papers. Please download here.

Everyday Magic: Objects of Daily Use in East Asian Buddhist Reliquaries

Akiko Walley
Maude I. Kerns Assistant Professor of Japanese Art
University of Oregon

One striking characteristic of Buddhist reliquaries is their diversity. The examples discovered from India to East Asia come in a variety of materials, vessel types, and ornamentations. Intriguingly, many of the vessel types chosen for these reliquaries had alternate uses in daily or ritual activities. This paper explores the ramifications of this sharing of vessel types between Buddhist reliquaries and other common or ritual utensils, focusing on examples from seventh- and eighth-century East Asia. It will argue that the choice of familiar vessel types in East Asian Buddhist reliquaries may have functioned as an expression of the magical nature of the relics of the Buddha that they contained, which were believed to actively respond to worshippers’ prayers and perform miracles.

Relic040-1-1

 

Friday, December 6, 4-6 p.m.  CWAC 156
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

 

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Nov.22 Shao Yunfei

Friday, November 22, 4-6 pm, CWAC 156

This workshop will pre-circulate papers.
Please download the Chinese version of the paper: 邵韵霏_presentation.
This talk will be conducted in English.

Complex Meanings under Two Perspectives:
A Study of a Lacquer Table Excavated from the Tomb of Zhu Ran

Shao Yunfei
Ph.D Student, University of Chicago

This paper is a close examination of a beautifully decorated lacquer table unearthed from the tomb of a general in 3rd Century China. Through iconographic studies, the author argues that the scene is related to a particular kind of ceremony or ritual practiced in the Han Dynasty. The author further explores the possible context and function of this lacquer table, its possible patrons and audience and their taste. As a conclusion, she places this complex design into its historical context and into the context of the tomb, and sees it as a demonstration of the “two tastes” of the people of the Three Kingdoms period.

图1朱然墓出土宮闈宴樂圖漆盤

 

Friday, November 22, 4-6 p.m.  CWAC 156
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

 

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Lu Ling-en, Nov.8

Friday, November 8, 4-6 pm, CWAC 156
This workshop will pre-circulate papers. Please Download here

Female Deities in Later Imperial and Modern China:
with Marici as an example

Lu Ling-en
Associate Curator, Chinese Art
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

This paper explores female deities and of women’s roles in the visual culture of later imperial and modern China. It reviews for the first time the later Chinese paintings, prints, drawings and decorative arts in the museum’s collection related to female deities and women. Many of these collections are rare in Western museum collections and therefore they are less studied. Research on female deities is especially important in the understanding of popular culture and religions, as the worship of them often involved both genders throughout a wide range of society. For example, Marici, an esoteric deity who is derived from pre-Buddhist religions and Buddhism, is also worshipped by the devotees of Daoism and of popular religion. Images of the deity not only provide remarkable insight into the female deities, but also echo the development of romanticizing women in art, opera and fiction. The goals of this paper are to provide my original research on these topics and generate new interest in studying such works held in museum collections.

 

Marici compressed

 

Friday, November 8, 4-6 p.m.  CWAC 156
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

 

 

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IFA CHINA PROJECT WORKSHOP

Dear all,

Starting from this year, we are glad to share information with the Institute of Fine Arts’ China Project Workshop. For further inquiry, please contact chinaprojectworkshop@gmail.com.

IFA CHINA PROJECT WORKSHOP SCHEDULE FOR 2013-2014 

October 18, 2013
Michael Hatch, PhD candidate, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University 

November 15, 2013
Zheng Yan, Professor of Chinese Art, Central Academy of Fine Art, Beijing

December 13, 2013
Lothar von Falkenhausen, Professor of Art History, UCLA

February 21, 2014
Qianshen Bai, Associate Professor, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Boston University

March 7, 2014
Hiromi Konishita, Associate Curator of Chinese Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art

April 4, 2014
Roderick Campbell, Assistant Professor of East Asian Archaeology and History, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

May 9, 2014
Eileen Hsiang-ling Hsü, Independent Scholar.

Please note that in addition to the seven announced presentations, the China Project Workshop expects to sponsor one or two other events in the Spring.

 

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