Feb 18 Wang Cheng-hua

*CAA Special Schedule*

Tuesday, February 18, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152

Art as Commodity: Business Practices Associated with Suzhou Single-Sheet Prints of the Qing Dynasty

Wang Cheng-hua
Academia Sinica, Taiwan

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This is a joint session with Arts and Politics with East Asia (APEA), supported by the Center for the Art of East Asia (CAEA).

Tuesday, February 18, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

 

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Special Session on Archaeology in Early China

 Tuesday, February 18, CWAC 156 11:00am-1:00pm
 
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TANG Jigen

Director, Anyang Archaeological Team
Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China

Public Archaeology in China: The Discovery of the Tomb of Cao Cao and the Surrounding Controversies

 

HWANG Ming-chong

Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

A Passage to ‘Monumentality’: the Introduction of Bronze Technology via Eurasian Steppe and the Formation of Chinese Bronze Technology

This event is made possible by the faculty of Art History and EALC department, the Center for the Art of East Asia, and the Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia workshop.
 
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu
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Feb 17 Eleanor Hyun

*CAA Special Schedule*

Monday, February 17, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152

Hide and Seek: A Qianlong-period Curio Vessel

Eleanor Hyun
PhD Candidate
University of Chicago

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This workshop paper stems from a chapter of my dissertation that examines a curio vessel made for the Qianlong emperor (r. 1735-96). It is an exquisite example of Qing (1644-1910) craftsmanship, which is now classified as a duobaoge (“curio cabinet” or “display case”). Through an analysis of its form and content, I will discuss the curio vessel in relation to Qing display methods, through which link it to Qianlong’s larger collecting practices and cultural agenda.  As a vessel that is commonly referred to today as the “emperor’s toy,” this paper will also focus on the activity of enjoying objects and the mechanisms that incite and enhance amusement.

Monday, February 17, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

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Feb 11 Tuesday Ching-ling Wang

*CAA Special Schedule*

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152

Praying for Ten-thousand Goodness: On Ding Guanpeng’s The Buddha Preaching and Its Context in the Qing Court

Ching-ling Wang
Curator of Chinese Art
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

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The painting The Buddha Preaching in the collection of the Ethnological Museum, Berlin, is by far the largest painting produced by any of the Qing court artists. It measures 525 cm x 950 cm and depicts a scene of the Buddha preaching the dharma while surrounded by various Bodhisattvas, Arhats, Vajradharas, and other deities. It was painted in 1770 by Ding Guanpeng 丁觀鵬(?-1770?), one of the most important court painters in the 18th century. However, other than a few very short introductions, this painting has never been studied in detail, nor does it come up often when scholars discuss Ding Guanpeng’s work. This paper aims to reveal the artistic value of this much-overlooked painting, provide new research material for the field, and contextualize the function and meaning of this painting by considering its original location, and to reconstruct the impact of its institutional and religious contexts in the Qing court.

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

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Feb 7 Wu Hung

Friday, February 7, 4-6pm, CWAC 152

On Silk Hanging Paintings’ (Guafu 挂幅) and a Possible Prototype of the Hanging Scroll (Guazhou 挂轴)

Wu Hung
Harrie A. Vanderstappen Distinguished Service Professor of Art History
University of Chicago

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Friday, February , 4-6pm, CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact Anne Feng anf@uchicago.edu

 

 

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Jan 24 Chelsea Foxwell

Friday, January 24, 4-6pm, CWAC 153

The Panned Out View:
The Illustrated Life of Ippen and the Visibility of Karma in Medieval Japan

Chelsea Foxwell
Assistant Professor
University of Chicago, Art History

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The Illustrated Life of the Holy Man Ippen (Ippen hijiri-e, 1299) by Hōgen En’i is distinct from other surviving medieval Japanese handscrolls of eminent monks thanks to a number of compelling visual characteristics. Most notably, its zoomed out, dehierarchized view of the Japanese landscape dwarfs the scrolls’ protagonist in almost every scene. This presentation reviews the circumstances behind the scroll set’s production and evaluates the rationales that scholars have previously offered for its distinctive mode of representation, including the paintings’ relationship to Song dynasty landscape painting. I then compare the scrolls with other, newly republished or reinterpreted paintings from the same period to offer an interpretation of the scrolls’ vantage point from the perspective of medieval Japanese Buddhism and visual culture.

Friday, January 24, 4-6pm, CWAC 153
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

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VMPEA WINTER SCHEDULE 2014

Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia is proud present our schedule for Winter  2014:

All sessions will take place in the Cochrane-Woods Art Center (CWAC)

2014-01-12 12.59.02Photo courtesy Wu Hung

Friday, January 24, 4-6pm, CWAC 153
Chelsea Foxwell, Assistant Professor (University of Chicago, Art History)
“The Panned Out View: The Illustrated Life of Ippen and the Visibility of Karma in Medieval Japan”

Friday, February 7,  4-6pm, CWAC TBA
Wu Hung (University of Chicago, Art History)
“On Silk Hanging Paintings” (挂幅)of the Tang.”

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CAA Special Schedule

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152 :
Ching-ling Wang, Curator of Chinese Art (Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam)
“Praying for Ten-thousand Goodness: On Ding Guanpeng’s The Buddha Preaching and Its Context in the Qing Court”

Monday, February 17, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Eleanor Hyun, PhD Candidate (University of Chicago, Art History)
TBA

Tuesday, February 18, 4:30-6:30pm, CWAC 152
Wang Cheng-hua,(Academia Sinica, Taiwan)
“Art as Commodity: Business Practices Associated with Suzhou Single-Sheet Prints of the Qing Dynasty”
Joint-session with Arts and Politics of East Asia (APEA)

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Friday, February 28, 4-6pm, CWAC 153
Quincy Ngan, PhD Candidate (University of Chicago, Art History)
“Circa 1547: Qiu Ying’s Polarizing Blue”

Friday, March 7,  4-6pm, CWAC 152
Yi GU, Assistant Professor (University of Toronto, Art History)
TBA
Joint-session with Arts and Politics of East Asia (APEA)

 

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Dec.13 Micah Auerback

Friday, December 13, 4-6 pm, CWAC 152

Joint-session with East Asia: Transregional Histories (EATRH)
Paper will be available shortly on the website:
http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasiahistory/

Painting the Biography of the Buddha in Meiji Japan

Micah Auerback
Assistant Professor
University of Michigan, Asian Languages and Cultures

Discussants:
Helen Findley (Ph.D. candidate, EALC)
Nancy Lin (Ph.D. canditate, Art History)

TBA

 

Friday, December 13, 4-6 p.m.  CWAC 152
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

 

 

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Dec.6 Akiko Walley

Friday, December 6, 4-6 pm, CWAC 156

This workshop will pre-circulate papers. Please download here.

Everyday Magic: Objects of Daily Use in East Asian Buddhist Reliquaries

Akiko Walley
Maude I. Kerns Assistant Professor of Japanese Art
University of Oregon

One striking characteristic of Buddhist reliquaries is their diversity. The examples discovered from India to East Asia come in a variety of materials, vessel types, and ornamentations. Intriguingly, many of the vessel types chosen for these reliquaries had alternate uses in daily or ritual activities. This paper explores the ramifications of this sharing of vessel types between Buddhist reliquaries and other common or ritual utensils, focusing on examples from seventh- and eighth-century East Asia. It will argue that the choice of familiar vessel types in East Asian Buddhist reliquaries may have functioned as an expression of the magical nature of the relics of the Buddha that they contained, which were believed to actively respond to worshippers’ prayers and perform miracles.

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Friday, December 6, 4-6 p.m.  CWAC 156
Persons with disability who may need assistance, please contact anf@uchicago.edu

 

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